30 - Hepatitis virus Overview of Hepatitis Virus Virus...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–17. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hepatitis virus
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Overview of Hepatitis Virus Virus Virus group Nucleic acid Mode of infection Severity (chronicity) HAV Enterovirus 72(heptovirus) RNA Fecal-oral +(acute) HBV hepadnavirus DNA Percutaneous; Permucosal ++(chronic) HCV Flavivirus RNA Blood(transfusion- associated) + (chronic) HDV B-dependent small virus RNA blood + (chronic) HEV Calicivirus RNA Fecal-oral +(acute) HGV ? RNA Blood ?
Background image of page 2
Viral Hepatitis - Overview A B C D E Source of virus feces blood/ blood-derived body fluids blood/ blood-derived body fluids blood/ blood-derived body fluids feces Route of transmission fecal-oral percutaneous permucosal percutaneous permucosal percutaneous permucosal fecal-oral Chronic infection no yes yes yes no Prevention pre/post- exposure immunization pre/post- exposure immunization blood donor screening; risk behavior modification pre/post- exposure immunization; risk behavior modification ensure safe drinking water Type of Hepatitis
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Human cytomegalovirus Epstein-Barr virus Herpes simplex virus Yellow fever virus Rubella.
Background image of page 4
Hepatitis A virus
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Structure Small, non- enveloped icosahedral particle, 27 nm in diameter ssRNA
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Replication Unlike other picornaviruses, however, HAV is not cytolytic and is released by exocytosis. Laboratory isolates of HAV have been adapted to growth in primary and continuous monkey kidney cell lines, but clinical isolates are very difficult to grow in cell culture .
Background image of page 8
Resistance Stable to: acid at pH 3 Solvents(ether,chloroform) detergents saltwater,groundwater(months) drying(stable) temperature 4 : weeks 56 for 30minutes: stable 61 for 20minutes: partial inactivation
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Resistance Inactivated by: chlorine treatment of drinking water formalin(0.35%,37 ,72hours) acetic acid(2%,4hours) B-propiolactone 丙丙丙 (0.25%,1hours) Ultraviolet radiation(2μW/ ㎝ 2 /min )
Background image of page 10
Hepatitis A Virus Transmission Virus can be transmitted via fecal-oral route ingestion of contaminated food and water can cause infection HAV in shellfish is from sewage-contaminated water Virus can be transmitted by food handlers, day- care workers, and children.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Concentration of Hepatitis A Virus in Various Body Fluids Source: Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease 1984;9-22 J Infect Dis 1989;160:887-890 Feces Serum Saliva Urine Body Fluid Infectious Doses per ml 10 0 10 2 10 4 10 6 10 8 10 10
Background image of page 12
Geographic Distribution of HAV Infection Anti-HAV Prevalence High Intermediate Low Very Low
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Age-specific Mortality Due to Hepatitis A Ag e g ro up (ye a rs ) Ca s e - Fa ta lity (pe r 1 0 0 0 ) <5 3.0 5-14 1.6 15-29 1.6 30-49 3.8 >49 17.5 Total 4.1 Source: Viral Hepatitis Surveillance Program, 1983-1989
Background image of page 14
Hepatitis A - Clinical Features Incubation period Average 30 days Range 15-50 days Jaundice by age group <6 yrs <10% 6-14 yrs 40%-50% >14 yrs 70%-80%
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hepatitis A - Clinical Features Milder disease than Hepatitis B; asymptomatic infections are very common, especially in children. Adults, especially pregnant women, may develop
Background image of page 16
Image of page 17
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/27/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

Page1 / 110

30 - Hepatitis virus Overview of Hepatitis Virus Virus...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 17. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online