HeadNeck III Special Senses-1

HeadNeck III Special Senses-1 - HEAD III: Special Senses...

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Unformatted text preview: HEAD III: Special Senses • Taste • Smell • Vision • Hearing/Balance TASTE: how does it work? • Taste buds on tongue on fungiform papillae (“mushroom-like projections) • Each “bud” contains several cell types in microvilli that project through pore and chemically sense food • Gustatory receptor cells communicate with cranial nerve axon endings to transmit sensation to brain M&M, Fig. 16.1 Five taste sensations • Sweet—front middle • Sour—middle sides • Salty—front side/tip • Bitter —back • “umami”—posterior pharynx M&M, Fig. 16.1 Cranial Nerves of Taste Anterior 2/3 tongue: VII (Facial) Posterior 1/3 tongue: IX Glossopharyngeal) Pharynx: X (Vagus) M&M, Fig. 16.2 Smell: How does it work? • Olfactory epithelium in nasal cavity with special olfactory receptor cells • Receptor cells have endings that respond to unique proteins • Every odor has particular signature that triggers a certain combination of cells • Axons of receptor cells carry message back to brain • Basal cells continually replace receptor cells —they are only neurons that are continuously replaced throughout life. Olfactory epithelium just under cribiform plate (of ethmoid bone) in superior nasal epithelium at midline M&M, Fig. 16.3 Vision 1. Movement of eye—extrinsic eye muscles and location in orbit 2. Support of eye—lids, brows, lashes, tears, conjunctiva 3. Lens and focusing—structures of eyeball and eye as optical device 4. Retina and photoreceptors Movement of eye Eye movement simulator ( http://cim.ucdavis.edu /eyes/version1/eyesim. htm ) Extrinsic eye muscles Muscle Movement Nerve Superior oblique Depresses eye, turns laterally IV (Trochlear) Lateral rectus Turns laterally VI (Abducens) Medial rectus Turns medially III (Oculomotor) Superior rectus...
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This note was uploaded on 12/28/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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HeadNeck III Special Senses-1 - HEAD III: Special Senses...

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