New class society 11 ver 3

New class society 11 ver 3 - I.  II.  III. 

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Unformatted text preview: I.  II.  III.  Sociological
imagination
&
new
class
 society:
social
issue
versus
personal
 problems
 New
class
society
defined
 Occupy
Wall
Street
as
a
social
movement
for
 justice
 Class
polarization
is
reshaping
society
&
 individual
life
chances
(compare
to
Beth
 Gonzalez)
 a.  2008
financial
crisis
confirms
thesis:
expression
 of
class
privilege
 b.  “Occupy
Wall
Street”
confirms
thesis:
protest
of
 class
inequality
(J
Sachs
–implications
for
reform)
   “restore
prosperity
and
power
for
the
99
 percent”
   Movement
should
aim
for
three
things:
 1)  Revival
of
public
services,
e.g.
education
 2)  Regulate
fraud
 3)  Re‐establish
democracy
   “real
issue
—
the
rise
of
global
competition
in
 the
information
age”

   Perrucci
&
Wysong’s
evidence
suggests
 lobbying
is
increasing,
e.g.,
$1.26
billion
in
 1997;
$2.2
billion
in
2005
(p.147)
   What
do
these
quantitative
increases
 suggest?
What’s
changing?

       Across
most
industries,
a
few
firms
control
 the
market,
&
employment
is
decreasing
 (Perrucci
&
Wysong)
 2008
crisis
resolution
resulted
in
new
public‐ private
property
form,
undemocratic
use
of
 public
treasury
(Too
Big
to
Fail,
Sorkin)
 Undemocratic
property
form
in
South
after
 Civil
War
(DuBois)
   Successful
tax
“reform”
during
the
2000s
 reduced
taxes
for
rich
   Unsuccessful
attempt
to
privatize
Social
 Security
(1935
Social
Security
architects
in
 Rockefeller
Foundation)
   Power
not
resident
within
government
   Superclass
power
resides
within
golden
 triangle
between
“information
industry,”
 corporate
foundations/think
tanks,
&
 government
   William
Watkins
(2001)
White
Architects
of
 Black
Education
   Accord
between
Northern
&
Southern
elites
 around
second
class
education
for
 “freedmen”
   Foundations
create
policy
power
outside
 government,
then
bring
it
in
   Peabody
Foundation,
Rockefeller
Foundation
   “Streaming”
at
primary
&
secondary
school
 districts
characterized
by
children
of
wealthy
 families
   Versus
low
rates
of
upward
mobility
at
poor
 school
districts
   2
classes
of
universities
&
colleges:
high
 status
versus
low
status,
implications
for
 student
mobility
             No
middle
class
(20/80
bifurcation)
 Demise
of
unions/high
wage
jobs
 Rising
income
&
wealth
inequality
 Gated
communities
versus
rotting
 neighborhoods
 Two‐class
educational
system
 Race
and
gender
discrimination
based
on
 organizational
scripts
       Classes
have
conflicting
interests,
what
helps
 one
class
hurts
the
other
 Privileged
class
pursues
its
interests
while
 successfully
disorganizing
new
working
class
 interests
 Privileged
class
is
big
enough
(40
–
50
 million)
to
close
out
working
class
upward
 mobility
 Source: RH Topel, 1997   Access
to:
   Consumption
capital
   Investment
capital
   Skill
capital
   Social
capital
     No
middle
class
 Organizational
 inequality
(firms,
 education,
urban)
     Technology
 Class
interest
of
 privileged
         Union
decline
 Tax
codes
 Property
laws
(biotech)
 Gov’t
programs
(military
 contracts,
industrial
 subsidies,
emergency
 bailouts)
       Health
implications
 (fundamental
&
 proximate
causes)
 Individual
knowledge
 vs.
structural
 knowledge
(soc
 imagination)
 Policy
knowledge
 U.S. Public Beliefs About Why People are Poor           Income/wealth
 distribution?
 Class
structure?
 War
and
peace?
 Poverty?
 Health?
 ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/21/2011 for the course DSOC 1101 taught by Professor Hirshel during the Fall '07 term at Cornell.

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