O7_ - Aim them at your lenses What do you see 4 Determine the focal length of each lens 5 Obtain an optical bench and some mounted lenses Use a

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O7: An introduction to lenses Materials: optical bench, concave lens, convex lens, graph paper Initial definitions and givens: focal point: the point at which incident parallel rays converge after passing through a positive lens or appear to diverge from after passing through a negative lens. focal length: f is distance from the center of a lens to the focal point. f is negative for a negative lens. Initial instructions and questions: 1) Take your ray box (with a single slit uncovered) and aim it at your two dimensional lens. Slide your lens so that the ray is hitting the top (thinnest part) of the convex lens and record the path of the ray. Gradually slide the lens until finally the ray is hitting the bottom part of the lens, and record your observations for several points in between. 2) Do the same for the concave lens. 3) Remove the tape from your ray box do that all 5 slits are projecting.
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Unformatted text preview: Aim them at your lenses. What do you see? 4) Determine the focal length of each lens. 5) Obtain an optical bench and some mounted lenses. Use a piece of paper as a screen to observe the images. Record what you see. How does this vary as you move the screen and the projector? Try looking directly through the lens. How do your observations compare for the pinhole camera and the lens? Guide to notes in your lab book: 1. Before obtaining an optical bench, try drawing a ray diagram of what you will observe when you mount the lens. 2. When observing the image on the screen, make a note of size and orientation of the image. When looking through the screen, also make a note of the perceived depth of the projector-- does it seem closer, or further away? 3. Try to draw ray diagrams to describe what you see. If necessary, observe your ray box again....
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This document was uploaded on 12/27/2011.

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