Chapt33_VG - 1. Moving charges (or equivalently electrical...

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1. Moving charges (or equivalently electrical currents) create a magnetic field, ! B ( ! r ) = μ 0 4 π q ! v × ˆ r r 2 , Here ! v is the velocity of the moving charge. This is the analog to the expression for the electric field due to a point charge. ! E ( ! r ) = q 4 πε 0 ˆ r r 2 Superposition applies if a number of moving charges are present just as in the case of electric fields. As in the case of electric fields, most of your grief will come from trying to apply the principle of superposition.
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2. A charge moving through a magnetic field feels a force (called the Lorenz force) given by ! F = q ! v × ! B . The total electric and magnetic force on a moving charged particle is the sum of the contributions due to electric and magnetic fields, ! F = q ( ! E + ! v × ! B) . Just to be confusing this is sometimes called the Lorenz force too. There are a host of consequences of 1. and 2., which will be explored in this chapter. An example is parallel currents attract and antiparallel currents repel . A big complication when discussing magnetic fields is the appearance of vector cross products . Don’t think that you can slide by without learning how to evaluate them.
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Magnets have “poles” labeled north and south: Like poles repel N S N S Unlike poles attract N S N S
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N
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Chapt33_VG - 1. Moving charges (or equivalently electrical...

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