ch05lect2_UD - Using UML, Patterns, and Java...

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Using UML, Patterns, and Java Object-Oriented Software Engineering Chapter 5, Analysis: Dynamic Modeling
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Bernd Bruegge & Allen H. Dutoit Object-Oriented Software Engineering: Using UML, Patterns, and Java 2 Outline of the Lecture Dynamic modeling Interaction Diagrams Sequence diagrams Collaboration diagrams State diagrams Activity diagrams (UD: interestingly, our book continues to ignore their significance; considers as a special case of State diagrams!) Requirements analysis model validation
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Bernd Bruegge & Allen H. Dutoit Object-Oriented Software Engineering: Using UML, Patterns, and Java 3 How do you find classes? We have already established several sources for class identification: Application domain analysis: We find classes by talking to the client and identify abstractions by observing the end user General world knowledge and intuition Textual analysis of event flow in use cases (Abbot) Today we identify classes from dynamic models Two good heuristics: Activity lines in sequence diagrams are candidates for objects Actions and activities in state chart diagrams are candidates for public operations in classes
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Bernd Bruegge & Allen H. Dutoit Object-Oriented Software Engineering: Using UML, Patterns, and Java 4 Dynamic Modeling Definition of a dynamic model: Describes the components of the system that have interesting dynamic behavior The dynamic model is described with State diagrams : One state diagram for each class with interesting dynamic behavior Classes without interesting dynamic behavior are not modeled with state diagrams Sequence diagrams : For the interaction between classes Activity diagrams : Model the (complex) logic (business rules) captured by a use case Purpose: Detect and supply operations for the object model.
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Bernd Bruegge & Allen H. Dutoit Object-Oriented Software Engineering: Using UML, Patterns, and Java 5 How do we detect Operations? We look for objects, who are interacting and extract their “protocol” We look for objects, who have interesting behavior on their own Good starting point: Flow of events in a use case description From the flow of events we proceed to the sequence diagram to find the participating objects.
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Bernd Bruegge & Allen H. Dutoit Object-Oriented Software Engineering: Using UML, Patterns, and Java 6 What is an Event? Something that happens at a point in time An event sends information from one object to another Events can have associations with each other: Causally related: An event happens always before another event An event happens always after another event Causally unrelated: Events that happen concurrently Events can also be grouped in event classes with a hierarchical structure => Event taxonomy
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Bernd Bruegge & Allen H. Dutoit Object-Oriented Software Engineering: Using UML, Patterns, and Java 7 Sequence Diagram A sequence diagram
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ch05lect2_UD - Using UML, Patterns, and Java...

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