ch16 - CHAPTER 16 WAVES AND SOUND CONCEPTUAL QUESTIONS _ 6....

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CHAPTER 16 WAVES AND SOUND CONCEPTUAL QUESTIONS ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 6 . REASONING AND SOLUTION A rope of mass m is hanging down from the ceiling. Nothing is attached to the loose end of the rope. A transverse wave is traveling up the rope. The tension in the rope is not constant. The lower portion of the rope pulls down on the higher portions of the rope. If we imagine that the rope is divided into small segments, we see that the segments near the top of the rope are being pulled down by more weight than the segments near the bottom. Therefore, the tension in the rope increases as we move up the rope. The speed of a transverse wave on the rope is given by Equation 16.2: wave /( / ) v F m L = . From Equation 16.2 we see that, as the tension F in the rope increases, the speed of the wave increases. Therefore, as the transverse wave travels up the rope, the speed of the wave increases. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 9 . REASONING AND SOLUTION As the disturbance moves outward when a sound wave is produced, it compresses the air directly in front of it. This compression causes the air pressure to rise slightly, resulting in a condensation that travels outward. The condensation is followed by a region of decreased pressure, called a rarefaction. Both the condensation and rarefaction travel away from the speaker at the speed of sound. As the condensations and rarefactions of the sound wave move away from the disturbance, the individual air molecules are not carried with the wave. Each molecule executes simple harmonic motion about a fixed equilibrium position. As the wave passes by, all the particles in the region of the disturbance participate in this motion. There are no particles that are always at rest. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 10 . REASONING AND SOLUTION Assuming that we can treat air as an ideal gas, then the speed of sound in air is given by Equation 16.5, / v kT m γ = , where is the ratio of the specific heats c P / c V , k is Boltzmann's constant, T is the Kelvin temperature, and m is the mass of a molecule of the gas. We can see from Equation 16.5 that the speed of sound in air is proportional to the square root of the Kelvin temperature of the gas. Therefore, on a hot day, the speed of sound in air is greater than it is on a cold day. Hence, we would expect an echo to return to us more quickly on a hot day as compared to a cold day, other things being equal. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 14 . REASONING AND SOLUTION A source is emitting sound uniformly in all directions. According to Equation 16.9,
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ch16 - CHAPTER 16 WAVES AND SOUND CONCEPTUAL QUESTIONS _ 6....

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