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CTPR 242 Fall '11 - Week 13

CTPR 242 Fall '11 - Week 13 - RerecordingMixing...

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Re-recording Mixing - Done on a mix stage, which is set-up like a movie  theatre: The mixers should hear the material in the  same conditions an audience will. - Also commonly called “dubbing.” (Mix stage  sometimes called “dub stage.”)
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Dub Stage
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Re-recording Mixing - The re-recording mixers adjust the level, equalization,  and panning of every sound supplied to them by the  sound editors. - They also perform additional processes, including  adding reverberation, noise removal, etc.
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The Mixing Hourglass
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The Mixing Hourglass - On the mix stage, we start with all the individual units  of sound, organized in tracks in ProTools. - We usually only deal with one type of sound at once  in what is called a pre-mix : We’ll only deal with the  dialogue in the dialogue pre-mix, only the  backgrounds in the backgrounds pre-mix, and so on. - The number of pre-mixes depends on the complexity  of the sound track.
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The Mixing Hourglass - Next, the pre-mixes are combined into a final mix . But  even in the final mix, three stems  are delivered  separately: - D, M, and E  – dialogue, music, and effects - Must deliver these separately for foreign delivery. - After the final mix, there is the print mastering  phase;  we will look at that next week.
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I. Mixing Processes 1. Level domain processes a) Level setting b) Compression c) Limiting 2. Frequency domain processes a) Filters I. High pass II. Low Pass III. Band Pass IV. Notch b) Equalization 3. Time domain processes a) Reverberation b) Pitch Shifter c) DDL
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I. Mixing Processes 1. Level domain processes a.) level setting - the most fundamental job of the mixer is to set  the level of every sound that is heard. - The faders  are therefore the biggest controls on  the mixing surface; also called pots  (short for  potentiometers)
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I. Mixing Processes a.) level setting
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I. Mixing Processes a.) level setting - On the mixing console, 0 dB means unity gain : input = output. At unity gain, the sound is played at the same level as input.
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I. Mixing Processes 1.
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