OJ Case - OJ Case 1. In the American Constitution, under...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
OJ Case 1. In the American Constitution, under the 5 th amendment it says that any U.S. citizen who has been accused of a criminal offense has the right to have his or her case tried in front of a judge or jury. The court must prove that you are guilty because you are innocent until proven guilty. This is where the burden of proof comes in. If someone is accused of a crime it’s the states responsibility for proving his or her guilt in court. A prosecutor must present evidence to support the states charges. Which is the responsibility of proving the case, or the burden of proof, lies on the prosecution. Due to the penalties of criminal conviction the prosecution must prove that he or she is guilt beyond reasonable doubt. The prosecution apparently didn’t successfully make their case because they lost. But their biggest mistake was it took six months to present the case against O.J. Simpson. When it takes the prosecution six months to make the case, the jury is going to have two thoughts: Either the evidence is overwhelming, or you're struggling day after day making it seen better than it is. And unfortunately in this case, it was the final thought that the jury got left with. In addition the defense had broken up every single detail and prosecution was unable to paint a clear picture that proved beyond a reasonable doubt the defendants guilt. 2.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/24/2011 for the course ECON 1011 taught by Professor Bob during the Spring '11 term at Bob Jones University.

Page1 / 3

OJ Case - OJ Case 1. In the American Constitution, under...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online