WritingResumethatGetsResults - 1 Writing a Resume that Gets...

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1 Writing a Resume that Gets Results Special Libraries Association June 15, 2009 Alan De Back 9152 Bloom Court Burke, Virginia 22015 571-212-5405 alan.deback@cox.net www.alandeback.com
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2 Overview Millions of people submit millions of resumes to countless employers every single year. Unfortunately, many of those resumes either receive a cursory review or are never even looked at. Despite the exceptional qualities an applicant might have, they are never considered for the position because the employer never read the resume. How can you ensure that your resume doesn’t suffer that fate, but instead rises to the top of the pile? The most important thing to remember is that a resume is not a autobiography. Many people treat it as such, thinking that it should simply be a recitation of everything they have ever done in every job. Instead, you must think of your resume as a marketing tool. How can you best tell your story in a way that will both highlight your important skill sets and interest a prospective employer? As an effective marketing tool, your resume will generate interest and hopefully land you that all important interview. During this workshop we will examine how to best turn your resume into that very effective marketing tool. We’ll examine two different types of resume (chronological and skills-based), discuss when each is most appropriate, and review the format of each and the content that should be included. You’ll also use several worksheets to begin the process of building your marketing- based resume.
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3 What Is a Chronological Resume? The most commonly used type of resume is the chronological resume. It’s quite straight-forward and reflects your work experience and education in reverse chronological order. Although the format borders on being autobiographical, you must be sure that your skills stand out. A chronological style resume must not become just an extensive laundry list of everything you have ever done in your career. A chronological style is preferred by most employers. Because they are accustomed to the format, they tend to be most comfortable with it. They know where to look and find the various pieces of information that they need and want. Veering away from a chronological resume may set off alarm bells in some employers’ heads, so you really should think through carefully your reasons for not using this very standard format. As a job seeker, a chronological resume will work best if your background is related to the job you are seeking. Your skill sets will usually be directly applicable and your accomplishments focused on areas that will be of interest to a prospective future employer. If you do a good job with a chronological resume, it will be relatively easy for the employer to see how your experience and skills relate. Let’s take a look at the various sections of a chronological resume and what content you should include. Heading
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WritingResumethatGetsResults - 1 Writing a Resume that Gets...

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