AU10Sensation & Perception

AU10Sensation & Perception - 9/26/10 1 2 3 Sensation &...

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9/26/10 1 Sensation & Perception Sensation Vs. Perception How do we get information from our senses? Vision Hearing Perception Organization How do we know how far away something is? Why do our eyes play tricks on us? We do not Have a Direct Contact With the World How do we gather information from the world? How can we trust our senses? Does the world determine what we sense or we determine how we sense the world? Sensation Vs. Perception Sensation: Detection and basic sensory experience of environmental stimuli Sense: System that translates information from outside the nervous system into neural activity Perception: Integration, organization, and interpretation of sensory information Difference between sensation and perception? Sensory Systems Energy input (sound) Accessory structure (ear) Transduction (Convert external energy in neural activity) Sense receptors (specialized cells) Transfer to CNS Thalamus (except smell) Cerebral cortex (produces sensation & perception) Adaptation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
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9/26/10 2 Sensory receptors respond best to changes in energy Helps focus attention on relevant stimuli E.g. Perceived loudness in a nightclub or plane; cold water in a swimming pool. Responsiveness to unchanging stimulus decrease with time Psychophysics Absolute Threshold Minimum amount of stimulus energy that can be detected 50% of the time Subliminal stimuli Supraliminal stimuli Just Noticeable difference Smallest change in intensity we can detect Weber’s law: The stronger the stimulus the bigger the change needed to be noticed Psychophysics Signal Detection Theory Signal-to-noise-ratio affects the certainty when we are perceiving stimuli in real world situations It is harder to detect a signal when the background noise increases Response biases: Tendencies to guess if a stimulus is present or not Coding Problem What information does the brain receive? Temporal code Timing of firing Morse code Spatial code Different neurons convey different information Coding Problem Coding Problem Doctrine of specific nerve energies Stimulation of a particular nerve provides codes for one and only one sense 8 9 10 11 12 13
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9/26/10 3 Applying pressure to your eyes makes you see spots of light McGurk effect Rubber hand illusion Vision Purpose of Visual System Transform light energy into an electro-chemical neural response Represent characteristics of objects in environment such as size, color, shape, and location Light One type of electromagnetic energy What we first see is not actually color, it is pulses of electromagnetic energy experienced as color The visible light that we see is a thin slice of the whole spectrum of electromagnetic radiation Electromagnetic spectrum ranges from short pulses or waves of gamma rays, to the narrow band that we see as visible
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course PSYCH 100 taught by Professor H during the Fall '07 term at Ohio State.

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AU10Sensation & Perception - 9/26/10 1 2 3 Sensation &...

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