5 - Sensory Evaluation

5 - Sensory Evaluation - Sensory Evaluation Jan 20 SENSORY...

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Sensory Evaluation Jan 20-Jan 27, 2010 S ENSORY E VALUATION How you evaluate the foods Five basic senses: Sight: related to expectation and previous experiences o Colour o Shape People ate more open to different shapes now than before o Size Gives variability in meal Taste: what’s happening on tongue surface and in oral cavity Taste receptors on tongue o Sweet Sucralose, aspertame Water-soluble in saliva interact with taste receptors o Salty NaCl, KCl When you try to vary salt component, it may produce a metaliic nature to product o Sour Associated with acids and their ability to ionize, providing us with H + Ex. acetic acid. Lactic acid, citric acid, ascorbic acid o Bitter Tend to be relatively less polar (hydrophobic) in nature therefore, delayed taste detected) Usually a more acquired tatse o ‘Umami’ Japanese term meaning “tasty/flavourful” Gives an earthy, richness – “meaty” nature (as in texture, not flavour) Ex. ketchup, mushrooms, soy sauce Associated with glutamines (naturally occurring or added) (ex. MSG) Adds a flavour enhancing component to food Smell: check if it’s “safe” to consume o volatile aromatic components of food o Olfactory bulb Top back portion of nasal tubes Smell interacts with taste to give flavour (through olfactory bulbs, volatile gaseous components interact with taste receptors) Touch: mouthfeel, temperature, hardness/softness o Tactile components o Feel o Texture (within the mouth/oral cavity) Mouthfeel – hard, soft, chewy, brittle Hearing: o Sounds of prep influences anticipation o Relates back to texture Ex. crunchiness generates a sound in the oral cavity Food selection can be influenced by multiple sensory cues: Proximal cues: taste, touch, smell, hearing, sight Distal cues: smell, hearing, sight
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Sensory Evaluation Jan 20-Jan 27, 2010 There are also other factors which can influence your selection of one food over another: Culture, religion, availability, ads, allergies, packaging, intolerances, fads, etc Flavour is a combination of taste and smell Sensory evaluation involves an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of food as well as the subjects .
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Sensory Evaluation Jan 20-Jan 27, 2010 Colour: Colour is the result of light waves striking the surface of the food with some wavelengths being absorbed and other being reflected . With white light, the wavelength reflected back will be the colour you perceive: Blue: 400 – 480 nm ROYGBIV Green: 480 – 560 nm Yellow: 560 – 630 nm Red: 630 – 720 nm Physiological primary colours: red, blue, green (associated with three types of cones on retina) All colours are a mixture of primary colours from a physiological perspective because of cell systems on retina Colour can be described by three factors: (1) Spectral colour Colour density (overall) (2) Hue Strength/chroma Purity of the colour Degree of strength of a particular colour
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5 - Sensory Evaluation - Sensory Evaluation Jan 20 SENSORY...

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