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Plant Anatomy An Applied Approach (Lecture ppt) Ch06_The_Leaf

Plant Anatomy An Applied Approach (Lecture ppt) Ch06_The_Leaf

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Ch. 6 The leaf For Plant Anatomy 2011, 1 st Semester
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Introduction Morphology Blade (lamina) Petiole: petiolate, sessile, sheathing Stipule: present, absent, deciduous Developing and unfolding Form 6.1, 6.2 Adaptation Grow and die P. 70~74
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Developing and unfolding Leaf buttresses Phyllotaxis Initial Marginal Initial→ epidermis Submarginal Initial→internal tissues procambium→ vascular tissues Leaf unfolding Maturation: base to tip Minor veins→ minor venation network forms leaf buttresses leaf axillary bud bud scale (cataphyll) P. 70
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Leaf form Thin, flat and green Wide range photosynthesis Transport Evaporation P. 70~71
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Leaf form Possible evolutionary pathways 6.1 Danger of thinking 6.2 P. 71~72
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Leaf form: histology Mesophyll and photosynthetic cycle: C3 plants C4 plants Mesophyll: No differentiated (unifacial) Monocots Needle-like Differentiated (palisade, spongy) bifacial (dorsiventral) (p.246) Isolateral (isobilateral) (p.258) P. 71
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Leaf form: Classification Shape, size, texture, colour…… Leaf margin P. 71
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Leaf adaptation: Form modifications……habitat Ecological adaptations… Ch 8 Water: Xerophytic Mesophytic Hydrophytic Sunlight: shaded sunny P. 71, 73
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Leaf grow and die Grow Primary growth- almost all Secondary growth- some Die Ephemeral One growth season- herbaceous perennial and annuals etc. Two years- biennials More than one growth season- evergreen- conifers etc. P. 73
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Leaf grow and die After rain During or after the wet season no a “typical” monocotyledous or dicotyledous leaf P. 73~74
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Leaf structure Dorsiventral leaf P. 74 Fig. 6.3
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P. 75 Fig. 6.3 Leaf structure epidermis
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Cuticle and cuticular sculpturing reduce water loss, added mechanical strength, resist abrasion by blown sand particles or blown ice crystals cutin, wax, other chemicals- flavenoids Aloe leaf surface 6.4 P. 76~77, Fig. 6.4 The epidermis
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Cuticle and cuticular sculpturing four elements: primary secondary 6.5a,b tertiary 6.5c quaternary 6.6 P. 76~79 The epidermis
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P. 78~79
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Cuticle and cuticular sculpturing epidermal cell monocots 6.7 6.7 & dicots 6.8 6.8 cell types, arrangement P. 79-81 anticlinal wall 6.9 6.9 , 6.10 6.10 P. 81-83 parts P. 81 adaxial and abaxial epidermis margins and tip of the leaf measurements 6.10 6.10 P. 82-83 P. 79-83, Fig. 6.7-6.10 The epidermis
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P. 80 Fig. 6.7 cuticular pattern costal cells Monocotyledonous leaf surface Back Back
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P. 81 Fig. 6.8 Dicotyledonous leaf surface Back Back
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P. 81-82 Fig. 6.9 Back Back
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P. 82-83 Fig. 6.10 Back Back
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