Pentose phosphate shunt

Pentose phosphate shunt - Pentose phosphate pathway So far...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Pentose phosphate pathway So far we have discussed the glucose catabolism with major emphasis on generation of ATP. Oxidation of Glucose to carbon dioxide via glycolysis, PDC, CAC generates ATP and reducing equivalents such as NADH and FADH2 which are further oxidized in ETC generating ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. Cells require ATP as well as reducing power for exergonic synthetic reactions. In most mammalian cells NADH produced by glycolysis and CAC is efficiently utilized by oxidative phosphorylation for ATP generation. Thus the NAD + /NADH ratio is always around 1000 (i.e. high concentrations of NAD + ). Therefore NADH is not the best reducing equivalent for synthetic reaction. In order providing reducing power for synthetic reactions, cells produce NADPH in a special pathway of oxidation of glucose 6 phosphate called pentose phosphate shunt. NADP + /NADPH ration is 0.01 in most cells as it is not used in oxidative phosphorylation and it is available exclusively for reduction reactions required
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/28/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

Page1 / 10

Pentose phosphate shunt - Pentose phosphate pathway So far...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online