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Neck-dissection-slides-060920 - Neck Dissection Jeffrey...

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Unformatted text preview: Neck Dissection Jeffrey Buyten, MD Susan McCammon, MD Francis B. Quinn, MD University of Texas Medical Branch Department of Otolaryngology Grand Rounds Presentation September 2006 Outline Outline History Anatomy – Nodal levels – Common nodal drainage patterns Staging Classification Sentinel Lymph Node History History Metastatic cervical lymph nodes – Early 19th Century incurable disease – 20th Century improved treatment of neck disease – 21st Century second worst prognostic indicator for head and neck SCCA 19 Century 19 th 1880 Kocher advocates wide margin lymphadenectomy 1881 Kocher and Packard recommend dissection of submandibular triangle for lingual cancer 1885 Butlin questions RND for oral N0 disease 1888 Jawdynski describes en bloc resection with resection of carotid, IJV, SCM. Ferlito, A et al. Neck Dissection: past, present and future? J. Laryngol Otol. 2005 (1) 1-6. 20 Century 20 th 1901 Solis­Cohen advocate lymphadenectomy for N0 laryngeal CA 1905 ­1906 Crile describes en bloc resection in JAMA 1926 Bartlett and Callander advocate preservation of XI, IJV, SCM, platysma, stylohyoid, digastric 1933 Blair and Brown advocate removal of XI. Ferlito, A et al. Neck Dissection: past, present and future? J. Laryngol Otol. 2005 (1) 1-6. 20 Century 20 th 1951 Martin advocates Radical Neck Dissection after anaysis of 1450 cases – Advocated RND for all cases. – Standardized the Radical Neck Dissection 1952 – Suarez describes a functional neck dissection – Preservation of SCM, omohyoid, submandibular gland, IJV, XI. – Enables protection of carotid. 1960’s – MD Anderson advocate selective ND of highest risk nodal basins 1967 ­ Bocca and Pignataro describe the “functional neck dissection” 1975 – Bocca establishes oncologic safety of the FND compared to the RND Ferlito, A et al. Neck Dissection: past, present and future? J. Laryngol Otol. 2005 (1) 1-6. Anatomy Anatomy Lymph Node Levels – Sloan Kettering nomenclature – Subgroups Common Nodal Drainage Patterns Level I Level Submental triangle (Ia) – – – Anterior digastric Hyoid Mylohyoid Submandibular triangle (Ib) – Anterior and posterior digastric – Mandible. Marginal Mandibular Nerve Marginal Most commonly injury dissection level Ib Landmarks: – 1cm anterior and inferior to angle of mandible – Mandibular notch Subplatysmal Deep to fascia of the submandibular gland Superficial to facial vein Marginal Mandibular Nerve Marginal Hypoglossal nerve Hypoglossal Lies deep to the IJV, ICA, CN IX, X, and XI Curves 90 degrees and passes between the IJV and ICA Ranine veins Lateral to hyoglossus Deep to mylohyoid Level I Level Ia – – – – – Ib – – – – – Chin Lower lip Anterior floor of mouth Mandibular incisors Tip of tongue Oral Cavity Floor of mouth Oral tongue Nasal cavity (anterior) Face Level II Level Upper Jugular Nodes Anterior Lateral border of sternohyoid, posterior digastric and stylohyoid Posterior Posterior border of SCM Skull base Hyoid bone (clinical landmark) Carotid bifurcation (surgical landmark) Level IIa anterior to XI Level IIb posterior to XI – Submuscular recess – Oropharynx > oral cavity and laryngeal mets Spinal Accessory Nerve Spinal CN XI – Relationship with the IJV Level II Level Oral Cavity Nasal Cavity Nasopharynx Oropharynx Larynx Hypopharynx Parotid Level III Level Middle jugular nodes – Anterior Lateral border of sternohyoid – Posterior Posterior border of SCM – Inferior border of level II – Cricoid cartilage lower border (clinical landmark) – Omohyoid muscle (surgical landmark) Junction with IJV Level III Level Oral cavity Nasopharynx Oropharynx Hypopharynx Larynx Level IV Level Lower jugular nodes – Anterior Lateral border of sternohyoid – Posterior Posterior border of SCM – Cricoid cartilage lower border (clinical landmark) – Omohyoid muscle (surgical landmark) Junction with IJV – Clavicle Phrenic Nerve Phrenic Sole nerve supply to the diaphragm C3­5 Anterior surface of anterior scalene Under prevertebral fascia Posterolateral to carotid sheath Thoracic duct Thoracic Conveys lymph from the entire body back to the blood – Exceptions: Right side of head and neck, RUE, right lung right heart and portion of the liver – Begins at the cisterna chyli – Enters posterior mediastinum between the azygous vein and thoracic aorta – Courses to the left into the neck anterior to the vertebral artery and vein – Enters the junction of the left subclavian and the IJV Thoracic Duct Thoracic Level IV Level Hypopharynx Larynx Thyroid Cervical esophagus Level V Level Posterior triangle of neck – – – – – Posterior border of SCM Clavicle Anterior border of trapezius Va Spinal accessory nodes Vb Transverse cervical artery nodes Radiologic landmark – Inferior border of Cricoid – Supraclavicular nodes Spinal Accessory Nerve Spinal Penetrates deep surface of the SCM Exits posterior surface of SCM deep to Erb’s point Traverses the posterior triangle on the levator scapulae Enters the trapezius about 5 cm above the clavicle Level V Level Nasopharynx Oropharynx Posterior neck and scalp Level VI Level Anterior compartment Hyoid Suprasternal notch Medial border of carotid sheath – Perithyroidal lymph nodes – Paratracheal lymph nodes – Precricoid (Delphian) lymph node – – – Level VI Level Thyroid Larynx (glottic and subglottic) Pyriform sinus apex Cervical esophagus Subgroups Subgroups Ia Ib Submental Submandibular IIa IIb Upper jugular (Anterior to XI) Upper jugular (Posterior to XI) III Middle jugular IVa Lower jugular (Clavicular) IVb Lower jugular (Sternal) Va Posterior triangle (XI) Vb Posterior triangle (Transverse cervical) VI Central compartment Common Nodal Drainage Patterns Face and Scalp Facial, Ib Lateral Parotid Posterior Occipital, V Medial Ib Lateral Eyelids Anterior Parotid, II Chin External Ear Ia, Ib, II Anterior Parotid, II Posterior Post auricular, II, V Middle Ear Floor of mouth Parotid, II Ia, Ib, IIa > IIb Lower incisors Ia, Ib, IIa > IIb Lateral Nasal Cavity Anterior Ib, IIa > IIb, III Teeth except incisors Ib, IIa > IIb, III Anterior Ib Posterior Retropharyngeal, II, V Common Nodal Drainage Patterns Nasal Cavity Posterior Retropharyngeal, II, V Nasopharynx Retropharyngeal, II, III, V Oropharynx IIb > IIa, III, IV, V Larynx Supraglottic IIa > IIb, III, IV Subglottic VI, IV Cervical esophagus IV, VI Thyroid VI, IV, V, Mediastinal Tongue Tip Ia, Ib, IIa > IIb, III, IV Lateral Ib, IIa > IIb, III, IV Staging Staging Nx: Regional lymph nodes cannot be assessed. N0: No regional lymph node metastases. N1: Single ipsilateral lymph node, < 3 cm Staging Staging N2a: Single ipsilateral lymph node 3 to 6 cm N2b: Multiple ipsilateral lymph nodes < 6 cm N2c: Bilateral or contralateral nodes < 6cm N3: Metastases > 6 cm Staging Staging Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma – N1 – Unilateral < 6cm – N2 – Bilateral < 6 cm – N3a > 6 cm – N3b – Extension to supraclavicular fossa Thyroid – N1 – Regional node mets N1a ­ Ipsilateral N1b ­ Bilateral, midline, contralateral cervical or mediastinal LN Classification Classification Radical – Gold standard operation Modified radical – Preservation of non lymphatic structures Selective – Preservation of lymph node groups Extended – Removal of additional lymph node groups or non lymphatic structures Radical Neck Dissection Radical Removes – – – Nodal groups I­V SCM, IJV, XI Submandibular gland, tail of parotid Preserves – – – – – – Posterior auricular Suboccipital Retropharyngeal Periparotid Perifacial Paratracheal nodes Modified Radical Neck Dissection Removes – Nodal groups I­V Preserves – SCM, IJV, XI (any combination) Notate according to which structures are preserved Selective Neck Dissection Selective Remove high risk lymph node groups based on tumor site. Supraomohyoid – Levels I­III Lateral – Levels II­IV Selective Neck Dissection Selective Posterolateral – Levels II­V – Postauricular nodes – Suboccipital nodes Selective Neck Dissection Selective Anterior – Level VI – RLN injury – Hyperparathyroidism Extended Neck Dissection Extended Removal of any structures that are routinely preserved in a neck dissection. Notated by naming the structure(s) removed. Sentinel Lymph Node Sentinel Overview N Neck 0 Techniques Results Sentinel Lymph Node History Sentinel 1955 First echelon node 1960 “Sentinel node” 1977 Demonstrated in penile cancer 1992 Morton reintroduced concept in N0 melanoma Currently widely used in melanoma and breast cancer therapy. Sentinel lymph node concept Sentinel Tumor spreads via lymphatics to a primary node. Examination of primary echelon nodes for tumor direct the need for surgical management of the nodal basins. Sentinel lymph node concept Sentinel Difficulties of lymphatic mapping in head and neck (O’Brien). 1. It is difficult to visualize lymphatic channels using lymphoscintigraphy because of proximity to the injection site. 2. The radiotracer travels fast in the lymphatic vessels. 3. If more than one node is visible, it can be difficult to distinguish first echelon nodes from second­echelon nodes. 4. The SLN may be small and not easily accessible (eg, in the parotid gland). N0 Neck Neck Occult neck disease – Head and neck cancer 30% – Oral cavity CA 20% to 45% Factors that indicate > 20% chance of subclinical metastases – Tumor thickness > 4mm – Size > 2 cm – Anatomic location Accuracy of diagnostic methods in detecting occult Accuracy cervical metastases. cervical Palpation Sensitivity Sensitivity % (range) 35 (30­40) Specificity % (range) 35 (27­42) CT 45 (17­86) 11 (3­21) US 46 (42­50) 21 (11­33) MRI 42 (20­70) 14 (5­26) US FNAC 42 (27­50) 0 A new approach to pre­treatment assessment of the N0 neck in oral squamous cell carcinoma: the role of sentinel node biopsy and positron emission tomography N0 Neck Treatment Neck T1/T2 N0 oral SCCA – Better 10­year survival in pts who had elective neck dissection. T1/T2 N0 tongue SCCA – 5­year actuarial benefit for elective neck management Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and N0 Oral Cavity SCCA Oral Multiple small case series display the feasibility of SLNB in oral SCCA Majority of lesions T1/T2 No standardized techniques All series compare – – – Pre op lymphoscintigraphy Intra­op localization Post op pathology Pre op Technique Pre Technetium – Day before surgery – Submucosal injections – 10­30 MBq Tc 99m per quadrant – +/­ local anesthesia – Avoid spillage – Rinse mouth Dosage does not correlate with ability to identify nodes Pre op Technique Pre Lymphoscintigraphy – Dynamic 45 ­60 minutes Necessary to clearly identify sentinel nodes SLNs seen within 15 minutes Static Confirms dynamic images AP / Lateral / Oblique Delayed images for non revealing dynamic studies Cobalt pencil Labels anatomical points – – – – – – Left / right mandible Chin Cricoid cartilage Sternal notch Oral Cancer: Correlation of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and Selective Neck Dissection Histopathology Oral Cancer: Correlation of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and Selective Neck Dissection Histopathology Oral Cancer: Correlation of Sentinel Lym Oral Cancer: Correlation of Sentinel Lym Pre op Technique Pre Blue Dye – – – Submucosal injection 2.5% Patent Blue dye No more than 20 min pre incision Oral Cancer: Correlation of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and Selective Neck Dissection Histopathology Operative Technique Operative Limited incision guided by lymphoscintigraphy and gamma probe Frozen section analysis Operative Technique Operative Gamma probe – Examine operative bed for increased signal – Tumor extirpation – Lead shield – Removal of high signal nodes – Examine removed node and compare to operative bed Complications Complications Reported complication rates < 1% – Cutaneous malignancy cases Injury of VII, XI due to limited exposure Results Results Sentinel nodes found in > 90% of cases. – Experience matters – Surgeons with less than 10 cases 56% success in SLNB Lymphoscintigraphy revealed unexpected bilateral or contralateral disease in about 14% of pts About 2­3 SLN per patient Results Results Up to 46% of SLN harbor metastases – Fine section frozen analysis Increases sensitivity to about 95% – Immunohistochemical staining False negative rates – 10% – Grossly involved nodes less likely to take up tracer Better sensitivity for T1/T2 lesions – Most false negative results associated with larger T3 lesions Bibliography Bibliography 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Lymphatic Mapping and Sentinel Lymphadenectomy for 106 Head and Neck Lesions: Contrasts Between Oral Cavity and Cutaneous Malignancy Laryngoscope, 116(Suppl. 109):1–15, 2006 Oral Cancer: Correlation of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and Selective Neck Dissection Histopathology The value of frozen section analysis of the sentinel lymph node in clinically N0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx LAURENT TSCHOPP, MD, MICHEL NUYENS, MD, EDOUARD STAUFFER, MD, THOMAS KRAUSE, MD, and PETER ZBÄREN, MD, Bern, Switzerland Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2005;132:99­102. A new approach to pre­treatment assessment of the N0 neck in oral squamous cell carcinoma: the role of sentinel node biopsy and positron emission tomography N.C. Hydea,*, E. Prvulovichb, L. Newmanc, W.A. Waddingtonb, D. Visvikisb, P. Ellb Oral Oncology 39 (2003) 350–360 The Accuracy of Head and Neck Carcinoma Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in the Clinically N0 Neck Taimur Shoaib1 CANCER June 1, 2001 / Volume 91 / Number 11 ...
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