Neck-masses-slides-050608

Neck-masses-slides-050608 - Embryology of the Neck...

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Unformatted text preview: Embryology of the Neck & Neck Masses Steven T. Wright, M.D. Shawn Newlands, M.D., Ph.D, M.B.A UTMB Dept of Otolaryngology Grand Rounds June 8, 2005 Neck Masses A mass in the neck is a common clinical finding. Benign Neoplasm Malignant Neoplasm Infectious Congenital Neck Masses An appreciation for the embryological development of the cervical structures must be made to competently understand and treat the disorders of the neck. End of first month 4 weeks 6 weeks 8 weeks Embryology and Anatomy Branchial System- 6 pairs of pharyngeal arches separated by endodermally lined pouches and ectodermally lined clefts. Each arch consists of a nerve, artery, and cartilaginous structures. The remaining neck musculature gains contributions from cervical somites. Branchial system First Branchial arch Maxillary and mandibular (Meckels) process regress to leave the malleus and incus. Ossification around Meckels cartilage gives rise to the mandible, sphenomandibular ligament, and anterior malleolar ligaments. Muscles- temporalis, masseter, pterygoids, mylohyoid, ant belly of digastric, tensor tympani, tensor veli palatini Branchial system First Branchial Arch Pouch Eust tube, mid ear Temporal bone Cleft EAC/TM Branchial system Second Branchial Arch Reicherts cartilage contributes to the superstructure of the stapes, the upper body and lesser cornu of the hyoid, the styloid process and stylohyoid ligament. Muscles- platysma, muscles of facial expression, posterior belly of digastric, stylohyoid, and stapedius Nerve- 7 th cranial nerve Artery- stapedial artery Branchial system Third Branchial Arch Lower body of the hyoid and greater cornu. Muscles- stylopharyngeus, superior and middle pharyngeal constrictors. Nerve- 9 th cranial nerve Artery- common carotid and proximal portions of the internal and external carotid. Branchial system Third Branchial Pouch Inferior parathyroids Thymus gland and thymic duct Branchial system Fourth and Sixth Branchial arches fuse to form the laryngeal cartilages. Fourth Arch Muscles- cricothyroid, inferior pharyngeal constrictors Nerve- Superior Laryngeal Nerve Artery- Right Subclavian, Aortic arch Fourth Pouch- superior parathyoid glands and parafollicular thyroid cells Branchial system Sixth Branchial Arch...
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Neck-masses-slides-050608 - Embryology of the Neck...

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