101210-opp - 12/10/10 1 12/10/10 2 We have a slight lead...

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Unformatted text preview: 12/10/10 1 12/10/10 2 We have a slight lead over Hamilton’s classes (52%-44%) but we are nowhere near 70%! 12/10/10 8 12/8/10 Physics 121 9 12/8/10 Physics 121 10 Average force of gas on the wall = (# of molecules hitting the wall in the time t) x (force each molecule exerts on the wall) Only the x-component matters. All we need to figure this out is our three basic equations, and a way to count the number of molecules hitting the wall. Fwall 12/8/10 molecule vx =m = Fmolecule t x vx = t Physics 121 wall 11 N=n (Volume) = nA( v x t ) n = number density = # / unit volume px = 2 m v x A vx 12/8/10 Physics 121 t 12 v= v 2 x +v 2 y +v 2 z = 3v 2 x vx = v / 3 12/8/10 Physics 121 13 p1 2 mvx 2 = nmvx A F=N = 2 (nAvx t ) t t Interpret F = pA N n= V 2 vx = 1 v 2 3 N 2 pA = mv A V pV = N ( 1 mv 2 ) = N 2 ( 1 mv 2 ) 3 32 1 3 12/8/10 Physics 121 14 12/8/10 Physics 121 15 pV = n molesRT 12/8/10 Physics 121 16 N = n molesN A 12/8/10 Physics 121 17 pV = N 2 ( 1 mv 2 ) 32 pV = nRT Make the N parts look alike. n = N / NA R T pV = N NA R Define: k B = NA 12/8/10 Physics 121 so pV = NkBT 18 p = Nmv 12/8/10 2 x kB T = Physics 121 2 3 ( 1 2 mv 2 ) 19 Chemist’s form pV = n molesRT N n moles = NA Physicist’s form pV = NkB T p = nmv 12/10/10 R = kB N A 2 x 3 2 k B T = mv 1 2 2 20 12/8/10 Physics 121 21 12/8/10 Physics 121 22 12/8/10 Physics 121 23 12/10/10 25 12/10/10 26 12/10/10 27 ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/28/2011 for the course PHYSICS 121 taught by Professor Shawhan during the Spring '10 term at Maryland.

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101210-opp - 12/10/10 1 12/10/10 2 We have a slight lead...

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