100 Years of Solitude Paper

100 Years of Solitude Paper - Jason Christian 100 Years of...

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Unformatted text preview: Jason Christian 100 Years of Solitude Professor Klayder 11/25/06 100 Years of Solitude: A Socio-Political Perspective of 20 th Century Colombia Ernest Hemingway once said, Write what you know. So strong are those words in literature. Rarely does an author write of anything but his or her own experiences. Gabriel Garca Mrquez never fails to follow Hemingways advice in his novel 100 Years of Solitude . Through his writings, Mrquez retells the stories of his life. Almost every event occurring in his novels traces back to some historical, political, or social event that he experienced at some point in his life. Not only does Mrquez write of historical events, but he also writes of stories told by his family. In Mrquezs novel 100 Years of Solitude , Mrquez animates the stories of his family and his life along with the influencing historical events of his early years living in his hometown of Aracataca. Mrquez grew up in the river town of Aracataca, Columbia. Here, many of Mrquezs early experiences took place, which he wrote of in numerous novels, primarily 100 Years of Solitude. One of the most influential events of Mrquezs life occurred nine months after Mrquezs birth (one year and nine months according to his father), the Banana Strike Massacre of 1928. Over 30,000 workers for the United Fruit Company, a United States company that subcontracted workers including the Colombian people in Aracataca, went on strike protesting better working conditions along with payment in cash rather than scrip (Ruch). The Americans did little to resolve the matter so the conservative Colombian government took charge by firing upon demonstrators and killing hundreds of strikers. Later, people begin to go missing. The Colombian 1 government erased the occurrence from history books and rejected the fact that the massacre took place (Otalora). In 100 Years of Solitude , Mrquez writes of his experience with the Banana Strike Massacre of 1928. Although he had not aged enough to experience the event first hand, the stories from his parents and grandparents create the basis for his writing. In his novel, Mrquez begins with Jos Arcadio Segundo organizing a striking party. After weeks of sabotage and striking, the government decides to take matters into its own hands. Much like the Banana Strike Massacre of 1928, the government fires into a crowd that seemed petrified by an instantaneous vulnerability (Mrquez 328). Rather than hundreds being killed, all the strikers were killed excluding Jos Arcadio Segundo. When he returns home, nobody in town believes the killings ever took place. It was as if it had been wiped from history much like the government had done with the incident in 1928. wiped from history much like the government had done with the incident in 1928....
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course ENGL 105 taught by Professor Berkland during the Spring '08 term at Kansas.

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100 Years of Solitude Paper - Jason Christian 100 Years of...

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