ay45c5-page4 - Pop I Abundances Mass Atomic Number main...

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Unformatted text preview: Pop I Abundances Mass Atomic Number main isotope Relative Number Mass Fraction H He C N O Ne Mg Si Fe 1 2 6 7 8 10 12 14 26 1 4 12 14 16 20 24 28 56 1 7  10 4  10 9  10 7  10 1  10 4  10 4  10 3  10 0.77 0.21 4  10 1  10 9  10 1  10 8  10 8  10 1  10 2 4 5 4 4 5 5 5 9 3> > 3> > 3> > = 3 > 4> > 4> > 3; \metals" total 0.02. H 1 10-1 He 10-2 10-3 10-4 10-5 10-6 10-7 10-8 10-9 10-10 10-11 10-12 C O Ne N Mg Na F Si Fe S Al P Cl Ni Ca Ar K Cr Ti V Mn Co Cu Zn Sc B Li Be 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Atomic Number Hydrogen and Helium are primordial to the big bang (in fact, the Helium is produced during the rst few minutes of the big bang). All the elements from Carbon on are produced solely in stars. The combined mass fraction of \metals" (Carbon and heavier) is usually denoted Z , so Pop I stars have typically Z  0:02. (Don't confuse this use of the letter Z with its other use, denoting atomic number. They are unrelated.) Note the very low abundances of Li, Be, B. These are hardly produced in the big bang at all, and they are in fact destroyed by stars { they get \cooked" into heavier elements. Also note that the even elements tend to be more abundant (by a factor of order 10) than their odd neighbors. This is 116 ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/29/2011 for the course AST 350 taught by Professor Dion during the Fall '09 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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