Cells160-page20

Cells160-page20 - Functions Anchor for other cell...

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Cell - 20 Microfilaments microfilaments are tiny solid fibers of coiled globular protein, actin. Functions Help maintain cell shape along with microtubules. Microfilaments often form a sub-plasma membrane network to support the cell's shape. Muscle contraction (actin filaments alternate with thicker fibers of myosin, an associated motor protein, in muscle tissue) Cyclosis (the movement of cytoplasm contents within the cell). "Amoeboid" movement and phagocytosis. Responsible for the cleavage furrow in animal cytokinesis Intermediate Filaments Made of fibrous protein forming a solid rope structure Intermediate filaments are composed of keratins. There are several different keratins. Intermediate filaments tend to be fixed in position within the cell, rather than being more "mobile" or transitory as microfilaments and microtubules are.
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Unformatted text preview: Functions Anchor for other cell components, particularly the nucleus Are important in cell attachments (desmosomes) Reinforce cells under tension, maintaining shape. Form the nuclear lamina (a layer beneath the nuclear envelope) Locomotion and the Cytoskeletal System Motor Proteins Most cellular locomotion is generated by motor proteins that associate with cytoskeleton microfilaments or microtubules. Myosin is a motor protein that works with actin microfilaments in muscle contraction. Two other motor proteins, dyenin and kinesin generate locomotion along microtubules for vesicle and organelle transport. Motor proteins use energy to generate movement. This energy supply is provided by phosphates from the energy molecule, ATP....
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This note was uploaded on 12/29/2011 for the course BIO 151 taught by Professor Edwards during the Spring '10 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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