{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Membranes160-page10 - protists are used to collect excess...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Membrane Structure and Function - 10 Hypertonic Environments An environment which has a higher proportion of solutes than found inside the cell will cause water to leave the cell. Salt water, for example, is hypertonic to the cells of freshwater organisms. A cell placed in this environment will lose water and shrivel, a phenomenon called plasmolysis, unless it has special mechanisms to prevent this. Plasmolysis in Plants Hypotonic Environments An environment that has a lower proportion of solutes than found inside the cell will cause water to enter the cell. Fresh water, for example, is hypotonic to the cells of all organisms. Animal cells may swell to bursting when placed in fresh water. Animal cells, therefore, require some method to prevent this and maintain osmotic balance. One method of doing so is through vacuoles. The contractile vacuoles found in
Image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: protists are used to collect excess water which moves into their cell, and periodically, "spit" the water back out into the environment. Contractile Vacuole in the Paramecium Full Empty Plant cells use osmotic pressure to their advantage, using the cell wall and central plant vacuole. As mentioned earlier, stored substances in the vacuole attract water that increases fluid pressure within the vacuole. This pressure forces the cytoplasm against the plasma membrane and cell wall, helping to keep the cell rigid, maintaining a condition of turgor. Turgor provides support and strength for herbaceous plants and other plant parts lacking secondary cell walls. When plant cells lose turgor, they wilt, a condition known biologically as plasmolysis....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern