M119L01to04-page4

M119L01to04-page4 - that class. The relative frequency of...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
(Lesson 2: Frequency Tables; 2-2) 2.01 CHAPTERS 2: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS I How can we efficiently and effectively summarize data or compare data from two or more populations? LESSON 2: FREQUENCY TABLES (SECTION 2-2) Example Let’s summarize the ages (in years) at which the 43 U.S. Presidents became President (as of 2007). The complete list of 43 ages may not be so appealing to people! The ages will be grouped into classes . Triola suggests using between 5 and 20 classes. The frequency of each age class is the number of Presidential ages that lie within
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: that class. The relative frequency of each age class is obtained by dividing the corresponding frequency by N , which is the population size. Here, N = 43 . The decision to round off relative frequencies to three decimal places was an arbitrary one. Age classes Frequency Relative Frequency Relative Frequency (as a percent) 35-39 0 0 0% 40-44 2 0.047 4.7% 45-49 6 0.140 14.0% 50-54 13 0.302 30.2% 55-59 12 0.279 27.9% 60-64 7 0.163 16.3% 65-69 3 0.070 7.0% 70+ 0 0 0% Sum = N = 43 Sum = 1 Sum = 100%...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 12/29/2011 for the course MATH 119 taught by Professor Kim during the Fall '09 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online