familypsych-page63

familypsych-page63 - What are problems with day care for...

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Extended community arrangements (committed to members). Shared child care. Contexts for family time (church can provide): 1) Parenting classes (with other parents & spouse) 2) Activities without age segregation, camps (interaction, not just listening). Singles with marrieds and with kids. Place for age segregation. 3) Family night at home 4) Retreats, festivals for day or weekend (not just marrieds again) 5) Older pals (adults) for kids Priority for single parent families 6) also play time for couples: tickle fights, wives thing humor is good with kids One of things that cuts down on family time is daycare: Infant and Preschool Child Daycare (2/3 of small kids in it, in 5 years will be ¾) Real source of concern Good for some single parents, not if avoiding parenting Part of reason for more childcare is due to more women in work force.
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Unformatted text preview: What are problems with day care for kids? Many serious diseases (Family Policy May 89) Children in daycare (especially infants) more likely to: Avoid parent when reunited (several studies show) Cry more at separation More temper tantrums, physical aggression, arguing, threatening (a number of studies show this). Less compliant, less persistent, withdrawal. Other problems with childcare agencies: Low pay, thus high turnover. Lack of consistent caregivers result in more aimless wandering by kids. Also less interactions with other kids & harder to learn words. (need to avoid centers with high turnover, poverty wages for staff) Conflict in values/rules between center & home Excessive peer dependence Especially dangerous (and especially valued by some) are “fast track” preschools & daycare centers...
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This note was uploaded on 12/29/2011 for the course PSY 200 taught by Professor Miller during the Fall '10 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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