notes.pdf - title author publisher isbn10 | asin print isbn13 ebook isbn13 language subject publication date lcc ddc subject The Joy Luck Club Notes

notes.pdf - title author publisher isbn10 | asin print...

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title:The Joy Luck Club : Notes ...author:Rozakis, Laurie Neu.publisher:John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (US)isbn10 | asin:print isbn13:9780822006855ebook isbn13:9780822071068language:EnglishsubjectTan, Amy.--Joy luck club.publication date:1994lcc:ddc:823subject:Tan, Amy.--Joy luck club.
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Page 1The Joy Luck ClubNotesbyLaurie Neu Rozakis, Ph.D.Associate ProfessorSUNY College of Technology at FarmingdaleincludingLife and BackgroundIntroduction to the NovelList of CharactersCritical CommentariesGenealogyMapGlossariesCritical EssaysReview Questions and Essay TopicsSelected BibliographyINCORPORATEDLINCOLN, NEBRASKA 68501
Page 2EditorGary Carey, M.A.University of ColoradoConsulting EditorJames L. Roberts, Ph.D.Department of EnglishUniversity of NebraskaISBN 0-8220-0685-5 © Copyright 1994 by Cliffs Notes, Inc. All Rights Reserved Printed in U.S.A.1999 PrintingThe Cliffs Notes logo, the names "Cliffs" and "Cliffs Notes," andthe black and yellow diagonal-stripe cover design are all registeredtrademarks belonging to Cliffs Notes, Inc., and may not be used inwhole or in part without written permission.Cliffs Notes, Inc. Lincoln, Nebraska
Page 3ContentsLife and Background5A Note About Modern Asian-American Literature8Introduction to the Novel9List of Characters10Critical Commentaries12Map42Critical EssaysTan's Women69The Fairy Tale70Modern Chinese History71The Chinese Lunar New Year74Review Questions and Essay Topics77Selected Bibliography78
Page 5Life and Background of the AuthorAmy Tan, whose Chinese name, An-mei, means "blessing fromAmerica," was born in 1952 in Oakland, California, the middlechild and only daughter of John and Daisy Tan, who came toAmerica from China in the late 1940s. Besides Amy, the Tans alsohad two sonsPeter, born in 1950, and John, born in 1954.The family moved nearly every year, living in Oakland, Fresno,Berkeley, and San Francisco before settling in Santa Clara,California. Although John and Daisy rarely socialized with theirneighbors, Amy and her brothers ignored their parents' objectionsand tried hard to fit into American society. "They wanted us tohave American circumstances and Chinese character," Tan said inan interview with Elaine Woo in the Los Angeles Times(March 12,1989).Young Amy was deeply unhappy with her Oriental appearance andheritage. She was the only Chinese girl in class from the thirdgrade until she graduated from high school. She remembers tryingto belong and feeling frustrated and isolated. "I felt ashamed ofbeing different and ashamed of feeling that way," she remarked in aLos Angeles Timesinterview. In fact, she was so determined to looklike an American girl that she even slept with a clothespin on hernose, hoping to slim its Asian shape. By the time Amy was ateenager, she had rejected everything Chinese. She even feltashamed of eating "horrible" five-course Chinese meals anddecided that she would grow up to look more American if she atemore "American" foods. ''There is this myth," she said, "that
America is a melting pot, but what happens in assimilation is that

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