Avian anatomy 2010

Avian anatomy 2010 - Avian Anatomy Angela Black DVM PhD Department Of Animal Sciences University of Maryland Avian Skeleton Skeleton is extremely

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Avian Anatomy Angela Black, DVM, PhD Department Of Animal Sciences University of Maryland
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Avian Skeleton Skeleton is extremely light, compact and strong Higher in calcium phosphate than mammalian bone Thin, brittle cortices Abundance of spongy medullary bone found in long bones of sexually-mature females – provide a source of calcium for eggshell production
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Avian Axial Skeleton Skull- Large orbits Scleral bones/form ring Limited movement of their eyes within the orbit Beak –attaches to the upper and lower jaws. Many variations Hummingbird, birds of prey, duck, pelican, etc.
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Ducks have tough, connective tissues “teeth” that allow them to filter water for plants, insects, etc.
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Avian Axial Skeleton Vertebrae Single occipital condyle : able to rotate head to greater degree than mammals. Avian neck is long and freely movable (8 – 25 cervical vert.) First 3-5 thoracic vertebrae are often fused. Last 1-3 thoracic vert. fuse with lumbar, sacral and first couple of coccygeal vert. to form the synsacrum Fusions create a rigid dorsal axial skeleton – necessary for flight
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Synsacrum - 18,19
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Avian Axial Skeleton Pelvis Pelvic bones are fused to the synsacrum Pubic bones are not fused ventrally – why? Chest/Sternal Area Coracoid bone (between shoulder and sternum) Fused clavicles (wishbone, furcula) – attached to coracoids and sternum by tough connective tissue Sternum- large, unsegmented bone Flight muscles attach here Keel – extension off sternum
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Chicken Skeleton
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24 - coracoid 25 - fused clavicles (wish bone)
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Avian Appendicular Skeleton Front limb (wings) Humerus Radius, ulna 2 carpal bones Carpometacarpal bones Digits
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Avian Appendicular Skeleton Hind limb (legs) Femur Tibiotarsus, fibula Tarsometatarsus Digits Generally 3 oriented facing forward, one pointing caudally (perching)
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31 - tibiotarsal 33 - tarsometatarsal
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Muscles White muscle – “white meat” Pectoral muscle of chickens and turkeys (don’t fly much) are white muscle. More powerful, but less endurance
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This note was uploaded on 12/30/2011 for the course ANSC ANSC211 taught by Professor Black during the Fall '11 term at Maryland.

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Avian anatomy 2010 - Avian Anatomy Angela Black DVM PhD Department Of Animal Sciences University of Maryland Avian Skeleton Skeleton is extremely

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