Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.docx - Surname 1 Student\u2019s Name Instructor\u2019s Name Course Date Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Tennessee Williams wrote the play Cat on a

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.docx - Surname 1 Studentu2019s Name...

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Surname 1 Student’s Name Instructor’s Name Course Date Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Tennessee Williams wrote the play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof in 1955, and it revolves around a crisis in a southern family. Brick is the protagonist in the play, and he is married to Margaret. In 1958, Richard Brooks adapted the book in a film portraying various similarities and some differences. However, the play provides a precious opportunity for debate among students and nuanced drama performances. In both the book and the film, various parts are worth arguing, comparing, and mentioning since they portray some differences and similarities. For instance, the use of sound in the play and film in Act 3 is worth mentioning and arguing in both the movie and the book. Besides, the location of the movie and the book also portrays some differences making the film more interesting to the audience. However, depicting Bricks at the plantation recovering from his knee injury and drinking in his room is an essential part since it allows the viewer to understand his relationship with Maggie the Cat in which they argue a lot. With the use of Bricks as the main character, Tennessee can portray some themes in the play. In the book, William embellishes characters as taboo catalysts, thus revealing themes of isolation, sexuality, and femininity. Regardless of the existing differences between the book and film, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof contain various parts that essential in portraying the specific themes such as sexuality, isolation, and femininity, while others display multiple techniques used in the play to communicate with the audience effectively.
Surname 2 While William continuously displays the Maggie and Brick’s bedroom despite the abundance of characters, Brook forges this in the film and by utilizing various exterior and interior locations aimed at suiting the film convections. In the three acts, William does not shift the position of the play, thus allowing the setting to become the main catalyst for the themes or motifs. However, making the bedroom as a personal room in the house creating the feeling of isolation in the play. Initially, Brick is not able to talk to his wife concerning the death of his best friend Skipper because they are isolated. Brooks, on the other hand, uses various locations to communicate with the audience differently as compared to William. As the film commences, Brick attempts to jump hurdles, which is an event that was introduced in the play to dispel the complexity of confinement insinuated by William. Margaret says, “We occupy the same cage” (Williams 13). However, this means that Margaret and Brick are not different since they are

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