faucherlindsey_StudyGuide_Shagoury_Ch2

faucherlindsey_StudyGuide_Shagoury_Ch2 - Section A Raising...

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Section: A Raising Writers – Study Guide CHAPTER 2 “Those Aren’t Just Scribbles” Clips 9 & 10 from Big Lessons from Small Writers 1. On page 16 Shagoury quotes Donald Graves. Graves writes about “learning how to mean.” Write a discussion (multiple sentences) that explains “learning how to mean.” In your discussion, include some examples (real examples, or “if a child does this . . . “ examples) to show that you are going beyond what Shagoury offers about the Graves quote. When Graves says that children are “learning how to mean,” he is describing the fact that at first glance children’s scribbles look like meaningless notes, but in reality they have meaning. Children understand what their writing and pictures represents, even if it is not so apparent to the adults reading it. Once adults can understand the connection between oral and written language, they can look at children’s first attempts at writing in new ways. If we look beyond the scribbles, we can see what a child intended to say and understand that they are comprehending literacy and is trying to demonstrate it. Children are becoming aware of the process of writing and are willing to take risks and try things out in their writing. One example is if a child imitates a parent by creating their own grocery list or note. Another example is if a child draws a picture and puts some letters on it in order to represent meaning (if a girl wrote on her paper that she didn’t want to eat broccoli at dinner and she knew her mom was mad).
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