BL problem - CHAPTER NINE BOUNDARY-LAYER THEORY His career...

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Unformatted text preview: CHAPTER NINE BOUNDARY-LAYER THEORY His career has been an extraordinary one. He is a man of good birth and excallent education, endowed by nature with a phenom- enal mathematical faculty. At the age of twenty-one he wrote a treatise upon the binomial theorem, which has had a European vogue. On the strength of it he won the mathematical chair at one of our smaller universities, and had, to all appearances, a most brilliant career before him, But the man had hereditary tendencies of the most diabolical kind. A criminal strain ran in his blood, which. instead of being modified, was increased and rendered infinitely more dangerous by his extraordinary mental powers. (Sherlock Holmes, The Final Problem Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 9.1 INTRODUCTION TO BOUNDARY-LAYER THEORY In this and the next chapter we discuss perturbative methods for solving a differ- ential equation whose highest derivative is multiplied by the perturbing parameter a. The most elementary of these methods is called boundary-layer theory. A boundary layer is a narrow region where the solution of a differential equation changes rapidly. By definition, the thickness of a boundary layer must approach 0 as e —> 0. In this chapter we will be concerned with differential equa- tions whose solutions exhibit only isolated (well—separated) narrow regions of rapid variation. It is possible for a solution to a perturbation problem to undergo rapid variation over a thick region (one whose thickness does not vanish with 3). However, such a region is not a boundary layer. We will consider such problems in Chap. 10. Here is a simple boundary—value problem whose solution exhibits boundary- layer structure. Example 1 Exactly soluble boundary-layer problem. Consider the differential equation 5y" + (1 + £]y’ + y = 0, y(0}=0, y(l) = 1. (9.1.1) The exact solution of this equation is e: __ fizzle Lia (9.1.2) y{x}$ 24; r 8:}[5' 419 ...
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BL problem - CHAPTER NINE BOUNDARY-LAYER THEORY His career...

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