During Jefferson

During Jefferson - corresponding with old friends and...

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During Jefferson's two administrations as President, he weathered several storms,  including a scandal involving him and his purported (and likely actual) slave mistress,  Sally Hemings, several secession attempts by factions both northern and southern,  repeated conflicts with a hostile judiciary wing led by Chief Justice John Marshall, and  most seriously, a spate of European wars that put American interests at home and  abroad in severe jeopardy. Despite these dangers, Jefferson was able to avoid a foreign  war, although he did so at the expense of his reputation and his country's good fortunes.  Retiring at the end of his second term in 1809, Jefferson left office in semi-disgrace,  having lost the confidence of many because of his grave error in judgment regarding the  embargo. He spent a productive seventeen years of retirement at Monticello, 
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Unformatted text preview: corresponding with old friends and advising his successors while devoting still plentiful energy to interests such as architecture, agriculture and mechanics. His final legacy involved the founding of the University of Virginia, which he helped establish in every respect imaginable. Years of ostentatious living and meager profits left Jefferson severely in debt toward the end of his life. He never recovered his losses, and was forced to submit to the embarrassment of a lottery in his support, later followed by an auction of his personal belongings. One of the rarest combinations of disgrace and distinction the United States has ever known, Thomas Jefferson died at the age of eighty-three on July 4, 1826, exactly fifty years after his Declaration of Independence was immortalized by the approval of Congress....
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This note was uploaded on 12/28/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Womer during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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