f38-math-in-computers

f38-math-in-computers - Math in Computers A Lesson in the...

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Nov. 2005 Math in Computers Slide 1 Math in Computers A Lesson in the “Math + Fun!” Series
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Nov. 2005 Math in Computers Slide 2 About This Presentation Edition Released Revised Revised First Nov. 2005 This presentation is part of the “Math + Fun!” series devised by Behrooz Parhami, Professor of Computer Engineering at University of California, Santa Barbara. It was first prepared for special lessons in mathematics at Goleta Family School during three school years (2003-06). “Math + Fun!” material can be used freely in teaching and other educational settings. Unauthorized uses are strictly prohibited. © Behrooz Parhami
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Nov. 2005 Math in Computers Slide 3 Counters and Clocks 5 0 3 9 4 1 2 7 8 6
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Nov. 2005 Math in Computers Slide 4 A Mechanical Calculator Odhner calculator: invented by Willgodt T. Odhner (Russia) in 1874 Photo of production version, made in Sweden (ca. 1940) Photo of the 1874 hand-made version
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Nov. 2005 Math in Computers Slide 5 The Inside of an Odhner Calculator . . . 0 8 6 4 2 7 0 7 0 9 4 1 1 + 5 3 6 5
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Nov. 2005 Math in Computers Slide 6 Decimal versus Binary Calculator After movement by 10 notches (one revolution), move the next wheel to the left by 1 notch. 0 1 2 3 4 After movement by 2 notches (one revolution), move the next wheel to the left by 1 notch. 0 5 0 2 5 1000 100 10 1 5000 + no hundred + 20 + 5 = Five thousand twenty-five 1 0 1 1 8 4 2 1 8 + no 4 + 2 + 1 = Eleven
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Nov. 2005 Math in Computers Slide 7 Decimal versus Binary Abacus If all 10 beads have moved, push them back and move a bead in the next position If both beads have moved, push them back and move a bead in the next position Decimal Binary
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Nov. 2005
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This note was uploaded on 12/29/2011 for the course MATH 34 taught by Professor Wei during the Fall '07 term at UCSB.

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f38-math-in-computers - Math in Computers A Lesson in the...

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