MUS302L - Middle Ages (400-1400) Sacred, Latin, Voices only...

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Unformatted text preview: Middle Ages (400-1400) Sacred, Latin, Voices only Chant (400-1400) First notation, sung by monks, no composers (Pope Gregory, but not really)-Recitational/melodic-Monophonic-No meter Organum (10 th-13 th C.) Rhythmic notation by Notre Dame School (triple meter), Protin-Very melismatic-Many counterpoints)-Polyphony Secular Troubadour (12 th C.) South of France (North was trouvre), themes of courtly love, de Ventadorn-Occitan text-Monophonic-Strophic-Homophonic (one voice + instrumental accompaniment) Motet (14 th C.) Ars Nova, imminent death (Bubonic Plague, Hundred Years War), Machaut (unified mass)-Latin + French (or one or the other)-Polyphonic (all voices)-Polytextual-Hocket points-Isorhythm (same rhythm, different melodies)-Cantus Firmus (from chant, repeated, but not very modified) NOTE: Renaissance motets (Dufay wrote last of them with isorhythm and did Renaissance motets), they begin using imitative polyphony and become more religious (essentially religious madrigals?) Renaissance (1400-1600)...
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course MUS 302L taught by Professor Dell'antonio during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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MUS302L - Middle Ages (400-1400) Sacred, Latin, Voices only...

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