me104_lab1

me104_lab1 - ME 104 Sensors and Actuators Fall 2002...

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ME 104 Sensors and Actuators Fall 2002 Laboratory #1 Introduction to LabVIEW Department of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara
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October 1, 2002 Revision By Aruna Ranaweera 2
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Introduction In this laboratory, you will learn how to use the LabVIEW development environment, which is based on the graphical programming language G. You will then write a LabVIEW program to acquire, display, and save an external voltage signal. As an extra credit exercise, you will investigate the effects of undersampling. “LabVIEW is a programming language just like other programming languages, such as C, Basic, or Pascal, but LabVIEW is higher–level. In text-based programming languages, you are as concerned about the code as you are about what you are trying to do; you must pay close attention to the syntax (commas, periods, semicolons, square brackets, curly brackets, round brackets, etc.). LabVIEW is much more user-friendly —it uses icons to represent subroutines, and you wire these icons together in order to define the flow of data through your program. It is sort of like flow- charting your code as you are writing it—and the net effect is that you can write your program in a lot less time than if you did it in a text-based programming language.” 1 LabVIEW software and hardware (data acquisition boards) have been installed on the PC’s in the Undergraduate Control Laboratory (Engineering 2, Room 2218). To launch LabVIEW , go to the Windows NT Start menu and proceed as follows: Start>>Programs>>National Instruments LabVIEW 6i or Start>>Programs>>National Instruments>>LabVIEW 6>>LabVIEW. LabVIEW software (without hardware) is also available in the CADLab (Room 2243). Background Reading Please read the following material prior to this laboratory: 1. LabVIEW QuickStart Guide 2 (LVQSG) With Modifications, Chapter 1 . 1 Paragraph excerpts from LabVIEW—Proven Productivity , April 2000 Edition, National Instruments Corporation. 2 Based on the LabVIEW QuickStart Guide , February 1999 Edition. Available online at http://www.ni.com/pdf/manuals/321527c.pdf 3
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. In this experiment, you will use the Search Examples feature to find and run an example VI (Virtual Instrument). 1. Follow the instructions on page 2-1 in the LVQSG. Experiment #1: Build a Virtual Instrument Part 1A In this experiment, you will build a VI that generates random numbers and plots them to a strip chart. 1. Follow the instructions on pages 2-4 to 2-13 in the LVQSG. Part 1B In this experiment, you will average the random data points you have collected and save your data to a spreadsheet file. 2. Follow the instructions on pages 2-14 to 2-17 in the LVQSG. 3.
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me104_lab1 - ME 104 Sensors and Actuators Fall 2002...

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