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me104_lab5 - ME 104 Sensors and Actuators Fall 2002...

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ME 104 Sensors and Actuators Fall 2002 Laboratory #5 Frequency Response Department of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara
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October 28, 2002 Revision By Aruna Ranaweera 2
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Introduction In this laboratory, you will build a LabVIEW VI that will enable you to obtain the frequency response (magnitude and phase) of an external system. You will use this VI to obtain (separately) the frequency response of an analog low-pass filter, an analog high-pass filter, an analog band-pass filter, and a DC motor. Background Reading Please read the following material prior to this lab: 1. Histand and Alciatore, Introduction to Mechatronics , Sections 4.4-4.5 and Section 4.10.2 (Up to and including Equation 4.73). 2. DC Motor Control Module User Manual , Pages 3-7 and 14-16 , LJ Technical Systems Inc. Experiment #1: Build a VI for Computing Frequency Response In this experiment, you will build a LabVIEW VI to compute the frequency response of an external system. 1. Open a new front panel and from the Controls palette, click on the Options navigation button. From the Function Browser Options pop-up window, select the Default palette set. Click on the OK button. This will allow you to view all of the functions in LabVIEW 3 DAQ board PC D/A Converter A/D Converter External System Figure 1: Measuring the frequency response of an external system
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1. Add the objects shown in Figure 2. Sampling Freq., # Samples, and Averages are Digital Controls , while both Frequency Response (Gain) and Frequency Response (Phase) are Waveform Graphs . You can adjust your axis labels using the Editing tool from the Tools palette. Figure 2 2. Right-click on both # Samples and Averages and change their Representation to I32 . This specifies that these digital controls will contain 32-bit signed integer data. 3. Show the block diagram and modify it as shown in Figure 3. To display the label for an object, right click on it and select Visible Items>>Label . Recall that you can view the terminals of any function by using the Wiring tool. You can find useful VI information by selecting Show Context Help from the Help menu. Here we will measure the system response of an external system by passing white noise ( Uniform White Noise Waveform VI ) as the system stimulus (input) and collecting the system response (output). The system response is monitored for a number of frames specified in the Averages control. The stimulus and response data is then sent to the Network Functions (avg) VI where all the actual computations related to the system frequency response are made. As you can see from Figure 3, the 4
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system input will be provided through Analog Output Channel 0 ( DAC0OUT ) of your DAQ Board, while the system output will be collected through Analog Input Channel 0 ( ACH0 ).
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