Film music chapter study guides

Film music chapter study guides - Chapter 1: The Sound...

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Chapter 1: The Sound Track and Narrative 1. 3 types of sound found in film are: Speech- Sound Effects- Music – Speech enhances a film’s narrative by - supplying a great deal of information that we either cannot get from the image track or could get only with the courtship of difficulty. Sound effects enhances a film’s narrative by - Supply new information - Used to ‘create’ objects, animals, or even persons that we can hear but cannot see – an off- screen sound whose source we are able to identify Music enhances a film’s narrative by - provide narrative cues, but these tend to be fairly general and are usually used in an over determined way, confirming with the music what we already know from the visuals or dialogue 2. Some obvious ways that speech can enhance a narrative - giving us a great deal of information - get a sense of the emotion of the speaker, which may confirm or supplement what we see in his or her face or bodily movements - explain and direct plot elements Some non-obvious ways that speech can enhance a narrative - voice-over narration 3. Sound effects can interact with images on the screen by - Ambient sounds are not ‘creating’ objects but confirming their expected characteristics. 4. Music is better at doing defining emotional states and situations, as well as influence and direct our perception of time in the experience of a film. Music moves easily between foreground and background and can take over the screen entirely during onscreen performances. 5. Background music is that it belongs to a film’s narrative register (like a voice-over narrator) rather than the fictional (digetic) world. Foreground Music is when the form of the music dictates – it ‘becomes’ – the form of the scene. Shot – A single strip of film, the basic unit of continuity editing; can vary greatly, from 1 to 100 sec (or more) Mixing – The combination (and usually manipulation) of directly recorded sounds Speech – one of the three components of the sound track; human speech in language (non-speech sounds such as grunts are usually considered to be more like noise); also called “dialogue” Sound Effects – (sfx, effects, fx, or noise) all sounds other than music or speech. Synchronization – Appropriate temporal linking of sound to mage; aids the impression that sound emanates from the world of the screen, an effect that is essential to orienting our relation to the screen. Volume – Physical strength of the sound we perceive, its loudness. Strictly speaking, volume is defined by amplitude, which is the power of sound (normally as measured in decibels).
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Foley – Sound effects created artificially and added to the sound track Sound Source – source of sound,… lol Music – In silent-film performance, the principal sound element; in sound film, one of the three components of the sound track Sound design – Sound editing viewed artistically or aesthetically in terms of the shaping of the sound track in a film; most often associated with complex practices of blending and layering the
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2012 for the course MUSC 1000 taught by Professor Alleng.feinstein during the Fall '11 term at Northeastern.

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Film music chapter study guides - Chapter 1: The Sound...

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