miniassignmentrmt

miniassignmentrmt - The Retail Consumer Retail Management...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Retail Consumer Retail Management 301 Tues/Thurs 11 am-12:30pm Mini Assignment 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
E-Tailing Through technological advancement, the use of the internet in retail is steadily increasing. E- tailing has become one of the more popular options for many consumers because of its convenience. Retailers like, E-Bay and Amazon.com have started to take advantage of the benefits of e-tailing and expand its market in such a fashion by appealing to consumers who prefer online shopping. As online sales generate a significant portion of revenue for retailers, more and more companies will look into the possibilities of e-tailing. Assessment/Description According to dmsretail.com, E-tailing refers to the selling of retailing goods over the Internet. The term is short for “electronic retailing”, and originated in the 1990s for being frequently used over the Internet. The term is an inevitable addition to other similar terms such as e-business, e-mail, and e- commerce. E-tailing usually refers to the business-to-consumer (B2C) transactions. E-tailing began to work for some major corporations and smaller entrepreneurs as early as 1997 when Dell Computer reported multimillion dollar orders taken at its Web site. The success of Amazon.com hastened the creation of Barnes and Noble's e-tail site. Concerns about secure order-taking receded. 1997 was also the year in which Auto-by-Tel reported that they had sold their millionth car over the Web, and CommerceNet/Nielsen Media reported that 10 million people had made purchases on the Web. Jupiter research predicted that e-tailing would grow to $37 billion by 2002 (searchcio.techtarget.com). The reported revenue for E-tailing in U.S. is about $76 billion in 2002, up 48% versus the prior year. By the end of 2003, revenue was reported to be $96 billion, which accounts for about 4.5% of the total revenues generated by retailers in U.S. About 7 million households in the U.S., were expected to join the ranks of online shopping in 2003. Among the daily online activities, the online shopping accounts for 3% to 5%.E-tailing is very popular practice for selling retail goods in North America. 2
Background image of page 2
However, the capability of conducting E-tailing greatly depends on whether the customers having access to the Internet, customers’ possession of computers and credit cards, the delivery system available to the vendors and the external legal environment for E-tailing in a specific country. Due to those factors, E-tailing is a lot less common in other parts of the world than in North America. For example, in China not many people have credit cards and people prefer to use cash when they are shopping. If the retailers want to set up a retailing website, the possible way for them to collect the payments is either to have customers to transfer the funds to the retailer’s account from the bank or have somebody to pick up those payments. It is too costly for the retailers to do so and brings too much trouble to the customers. Obviously, there is not necessary support for establishing E-tailing in China.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/02/2012 for the course RMT 301 taught by Professor Amandanicholson during the Fall '11 term at Syracuse.

Page1 / 13

miniassignmentrmt - The Retail Consumer Retail Management...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online