Chapter 3 Skin - INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE Skin ENTRY INTO BODY The approximate order of descending effectiveness for Intraperitoneal Subcutaneous

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INDUSTRIAL INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE HYGIENE Skin Skin
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ENTRY INTO BODY ENTRY INTO BODY The approximate order of descending The approximate order of descending effectiveness for effectiveness for Intravenous administration Intravenous administration Inhalation route Inhalation route Intraperitoneal Intraperitoneal Subcutaneous Subcutaneous Intramuscular Intramuscular Intradermal Intradermal Oral Oral Topical Topical
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ENTRY INTO BODY ENTRY INTO BODY Industrial exposure to toxic agents is most Industrial exposure to toxic agents is most frequently a result of frequently a result of Inhalation Inhalation Topical Topical
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SKIN SKIN Organ of the body Surface area is 2 m² and about 2 mm thick
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SKIN SKIN Skin Functions Body Covering Keep tissue fluids in Keep chemicals out Keep bacteria, fungi, and viruses out Sensors for touch, pain, and temperature Adornment Vitamin D production Temperature regulation sweating, blood flow Sun protection Detoxification/activation of drugs and chemicals Immunoserveillance
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ANATOMY OF SKIN ANATOMY OF SKIN Epidermis Outer layer contains the stratum corneum The rate limiting step in dermal or percutaneous absorption is diffusion through the epidermis Dermis Much thicker than epidermis True skin & is the main natural protection against trauma Contains Sweat glands Sebaceous glands Blood vessels Hair Nails Subcutaneous Layer Contains the fatty tissues which cushion & insulate
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CAUSES OF OCCUPATIONAL CAUSES OF OCCUPATIONAL SKIN DISORDERS SKIN DISORDERS Skin disorders account for 23-25% of all occupational diseases Lacerations & punctures accounts for 82% of all occupational skin injuries Skin disorders account for 13% (1997) down from
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2012 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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Chapter 3 Skin - INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE Skin ENTRY INTO BODY The approximate order of descending effectiveness for Intraperitoneal Subcutaneous

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