Cutaneous Fungal Infections 9.14.37 PM

Cutaneous Fungal Infections 9.14.37 PM - Cutaneous Fungal...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cutaneous Fungal Infections o Dermatophytosis - "ringworm" disease of the nails, hair, and/or stratum corneum of the skin caused by fungi called dermatophytes. o Dermatomycosis - more general name for any skin disease caused by a fungus.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
THE SKIN PLANTS Etiological agents are called dermatophytes - "skin plants". Three important anamorphic genera, (i.e., Microsporum , Trichophyton , and Epidermophyton ), are involved in ringworm. Dermatophytes are keratinophilic - "keratin loving". Keratin is a major protein found in horns, hooves, nails, hair, and skin. Ringworm - disease called ‘herpes' by the Greeks, and by the Romans ‘tinea' (which means small insect larvae).
Background image of page 2
Infections by Dermatophytes Severity of ringworm disease depends on (1) strains or species of fungus involved and (2) sensitivity of the host to a particular pathogenic fungus. More severe reactions occur when a dermatophyte crosses non-host lines (e.g., from an animal species to man). Among dermatophytes there appears to be a evolutionary transition from a saprophytic to a parasitic lifestyle. Geophilic species - keratin-utilizing soil saprophytes (e.g., M. gypseum , T. ajelloi ). Zoophilic species - keratin-utilizing on hosts - living animals (e.g., M. canis , T. verrucosum ). Anthropophilic species - keratin-utilizing on hosts - humans (e.g., M. audounii , T. tonsurans )
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Clinical manifestations of ringworm infections are called different names on basis of location of infection sites tinea capitis - ringworm infection of the head, scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes tinea favosa - ringworm infection of the scalp (crusty hair) tinea corporis - ringworm infection of the body (smooth skin) tinea cruris - ringworm infection of the groin (jock itch) tinea unguium - ringworm infection of the nails tinea barbae - ringworm infection of the beard tinea manuum - ringworm infection of the hand tinea pedis - ringworm infection of the foot (athlete's foot)
Background image of page 4
Species found in different anamorphic genera are the cause of different clinical manifestations of ring worm Microsporum - infections on skin and hair (not the cause of TINEA UNGUIUM) Epidermophyton - infections on skin and nails (not the cause of TINEA CAPITIS) Trichophyton - infections on skin, hair, and nails.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Major sources of ringworm infection Schools, military camps, prisons. Warm damp areas (e.g., tropics, moisture accumulation in clothing and shoes). Historical note: More people were shipped out of the Pacific Theater in WWII back to U.S. because of ringworm infection then through injury. Animals (e.g., dogs, cats, cattle, poultry, etc.).
Background image of page 6
Diagnosis Note the symptoms. Microscopic examination of slides of skin
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 50

Cutaneous Fungal Infections 9.14.37 PM - Cutaneous Fungal...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online