smallpox - Variola(Smallpox Mimics Varicella(Chickenpox...

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 Variola (Smallpox) Mimics:      Varicella (Chickenpox)   Herpes Zoster (Shingles)   Molluscum Contagiosum View Table
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 Variola (Smallpox) Back
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Variola (Smallpox) View Table Chart from the Center for  Disease Control and  Prevention showing the  characteristic distribution  of smallpox lesions.
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Variola (Smallpox) View Table Smallpox in a child: Notice the characteristic distribution  of the lesions, more concentrated on the distal  extremities and face and less concentrated on the trunk.
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Variola (Smallpox) View Table Smallpox on the hand:  Notice how these lesions have  become confluent.
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Variola (Smallpox) View Table Smallpox in a child: Notice the progression and  distribution of the lesions from day 1 to day 7.
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Variola (Smallpox) View Table Smallpox in a man: Notice the diffuse and extensive  distribution of lesions, with a greater concentration of  lesions on his face than on his trunk.
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Variola (Smallpox) View Table Smallpox in a child: Notice that all lesions are in the  same stage of development.
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Variola (Smallpox) View Table Smallpox is an acute exanthematous disease caused  by infection with the poxvirus variola.  The significant clinical features include:  Three-day prodromal illness characterized by fever,  headache, backache, and vomiting.   Generalized centrifugal rash that follows prodrome  Begins centrally then spreads to the extremities  and face  Rapid succession of papules, vesicles,  pustules, umbilication, and crusting over a 14-day  period.  Prior vaccination may alter the clinical presentation of  smallpox. The following description applies to the  classic presentation in unvaccinated individuals. 
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Variola (Smallpox) View Table A macular red rash may precede the appearance of the  papules, which are deep and firm to palpation. Papules  soon vesiculate, forming a circumscribed, elevated lesion  that contains clear fluid. The rash at this point can be very  sparse, although individual vesicles can coalesce to form  large patches. As the vesicles mature, they turn into  pustules.
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smallpox - Variola(Smallpox Mimics Varicella(Chickenpox...

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