Tony Chu - Skin Cancer2

Tony Chu - Skin Cancer2 - Prevention and Management of Skin...

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Tony Chu Dermatology at Imperial College, Hammersmith Campus Prevention and Management of Skin Problems
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Dermatology IC at Hammersmith Skin and Renal Transplantation Renal transplantation demands systemic immunosuppression to prevent graft rejection Immunosuppression has a major impact on the skin increasing the incidence of infections, pre- cancerous and cancerous changes in the skin Many of the skin problems related to immunosuppression can be reduced with appropriate advice and management
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Dermatology IC at Hammersmith Immunosuppression and Infection Infections are more common in the immunosuppressed patient: Acute bacterial - folliculitis, furunculosis, abscesses, cellulitis, erysipelas Chronic infection - tuberculosis Viral infections - herpes simplex, warts Fungal - ringworm, tinea versicolor Most can be treated conventionally
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Dermatology IC at Hammersmith Warts and the Immunosuppressed Warts are caused by the human papilloma virus They are commonest in childhood but a common nuisance at all times of life Human papilloma virus is now implicated in the development of cervical cancer - HPV types 16, 18, 45 and 31 parts of the viral DNA - E6 and E7 - link to specific genes in human cells, transforming them into cancer cells
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Dermatology IC at Hammersmith Immunosuppression, Warts and Skin Cancer Genetic model - Epidermodysplasia verruciformis Genetic immunosuppression predisposes to infection with specific wart viruses - HPV 5 and 8 Following sun exposure, the virus leads to transformation of skin cells into cancer cells and the development of squamous cell carcinomas
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Dermatology IC at Hammersmith Warts in Renal Transplant Recipients Warts tend to develop after 4 to 5 years following transplantation Increased in sun exposed areas Many will contain EV warts virus or other oncogenic viruses Real risk of these warts developing into squamous cell carcinomas following sun exposure
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Tony Chu - Skin Cancer2 - Prevention and Management of Skin...

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