Rabies - Suzanne M. Thomas Dawn Bauer Vivian Moughni 1. 2....

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Suzanne M. Thomas Dawn Bauer Vivian Moughni
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Presentation Outline 1. Some facts about rabies 2. History of the rabies virus 3. Transmission 4. Symptoms 5. Prevalence 6. Morphology and genome 7. Important viral proteins 8. Replication cycle 9. Diagnostic Techniques 10. Prevention, including pre- and post-exposure treatments 11. Conclusion
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Some Facts about Rabies Belongs to the family Rhabdoviridae Genus Lyssavirus (Greek root “lyssa”) Infects warm-blooded mammals, including humans Causes encephalitis of the central nervous system Results in death of the host
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History of Rabies Virus Man described the disease in 2300 B.C. in the Eshnunna Code of Mesopotomia. The origin “ rabhas”, meaning “to do violence” comes from ancient Indian Sanskrit dating 3000 B.C. Many cultures have incorporated myths and legends that can be connected to the rabies virus.
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History of the Rabies Virus Outbreak of rabies in Europe in 20 th century spawned the Vampire myth- linked to bats. Rabies epidemic in 13 th century France may have spurred Werewolf myth as well- linked to wolves. Rabies is commonly spread by bats and wolves and other wildlife like foxes and coyotes. www.Davidsposters.com
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History of the Rabies Virus Since Roman times, man established the link between the infectivity of a rabid dogs saliva and the spread of the disease. Because there is no cure for rabies, those that had been bitten by a rabid dog would commonly commit suicide to avoid the painful death that would inevitably follow.
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History of the Rabies Virus Louis Pasteur was the first person to diagnose that rabies targeted the CNS. Also determined that nervous tissue of an infected human or animal also contained the virus. In 1890 created the rabies vaccine and saved 9 year old Joseph Meister after he had been bit by a rabid dog.
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Transmission of Rabies Is zoonotic, meaning is transmitted from animal-animal or animal-human. Rabies is most commonly contracted from the bite of an animal that is infected with the virus. The virus is found in the saliva of the infected animal.
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Transmission of Rabies Can also enter via any mucous membrane, such as the eye, nose or mouth. Handling and skinning of infected animal carcasses. Few cases of human to human transmission. Can be transmitted via aerosol, but that’s also uncommon.
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Inside the U.S., important reservoirs for the transmission of the disease are wild animals such as raccoons, skunks, foxes, bats, and coyotes. The time it takes for rabies to affect the animal averages 1-3 months. Sometimes may only be a few days, and rarely longer than a year after exposure. www.cdc.gov/rabies.htm
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Rabies - Suzanne M. Thomas Dawn Bauer Vivian Moughni 1. 2....

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