Chptr_3 - NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM ACTIVIT Y AND SOURCES OF...

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3 NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM ACTIVITY AND SOURCES OF DEMAND
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3 NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM ACTIVITY AND SOURCES OF DEMAND Aviation activity in the United States involves a number of diverse participants: large com- mercial air carriers, regional/commuter airlines, the military, and general aviation operators. Passenger enplanements, aircraft operations, and air cargo tonnage are all indicators of aviation activity. This chapter provides statistics on current and projected aviation activity, and describes significant developments in the sources of demand. 3.1 Passenger Enplanements and Aircraft Operations In FY 1999, passenger enplanements grew by 2.6 percent to 659.9 million, following the growth of the U.S. economy. In the same period, the number of aircraft operations rose by 4.1 percent to 68 million. The FAA forecasts that enplanements will top one billion for the first time in 2010 and reach 1.046 billion in 2011, an increase of 59 percent over 1999. Operations are forecast to reach 86.9 million in 2011, an increase of 28 percent over the 12-year period. Figure 3-1 shows the trend in passenger enplanements and aircraft operations from 1994 through 2011. 3 20 NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM ACTIVITY AND SOURCES OF DEMAND Figure 3-1 Enplanements and Operations, FY 1994-2011 3 2000 Aviation Capacity Enhancement Plan 3 Most FAA statistics and all forecasts are reported by fiscal year. The ACE Plan reports activity statistics by fiscal year to facilitate comparisons with the forecasts. Figures that report calendar year data are specifically identified as such. Historical Forecast Operations in Millions Enplanements in Billions 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 1.0 0.4 100 60 70 80 90 0.6 0.8
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NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM ACTIVITY AND SOURCES OF DEMAND 3 3 .1.1 Enplanements and Operations at the Busiest Airports Enplanements and operations for the busiest 100 airports in the U.S., as measured by 1999 passenger enplanements, are shown in Appendix A. Because of the concentration of com- mercial traffic at larger airports and the dispersion of general aviation operations across a wide range of airports, those 100 airports accounted for more than 96 percent of total pas- senger enplanements, but only 42 percent of total aircraft operations. The number of enplanements at the 100 busiest airports increased from 609.9 million in 1998 to 634.8 million in 1999, a 4.1 percent increase. In the same period, operations at the 100 busiest airports increased by 3.3 percent, from 27.5 to 28.4 million. The FAA forecasts that enplane- ments at these airports will grow to 994.2 million in 2011 (an increase of 57 percent) and that operations will increase to 36 million (up 27 percent). The concentration of traffic at the largest airports is highlighted in Figures 3-2 and 3-3, which show the busiest ten U.S. airports during 1999, as measured by enplanements and operations, respectively, and the FAA forecasts for the same airports in 2011. The busiest ten airports accounted for 35.5 percent of total passenger enplanements in 1999 and only 9.7 percent of total aircraft operations. The FAA forecasts growth in both enplanements and operations at these ten airports to keep pace with national trends.
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Chptr_3 - NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM ACTIVIT Y AND SOURCES OF...

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