What_is_the_relationship_between_parent_acculturation_stress_academic_self-efficacy.doc

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Running head: PARENT ACCULTURATION STRESS AND ACADEMIC SELF-EFFICACY 1 What is the Relationship between Parent Acculturation Stress, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Academic Performance in Latino American Adolescents? Student’s Name: Institutional Affiliation:
PARENT ACCULTURATION STRESS AND ACADEMIC SELF-EFFICACY 2 Abstract The population of immigrants and immigrant American children has been on a trend of consistent increase. It is now estimated that about one-quarter (25 percent) of American children aged 18 years and below are from immigrant households. With this unprecedented increase in the immigrant population, it is imperative to give extra attention to the protective and risk factors of US-born and immigrant Latino parents and children, particularly as regard acculturation stress of parents, as well as the impacts of this type of stress of children’s academic self-efficacy and academic accomplishment. Family conflict, including acculturation stress, rank among the most prominent risk factors for minority youths that enhance the likelihood for developing behavioral problems that, in turn, impinge on the adolescents’ academic performance. The aim of the proposed study is to examine the mechanisms that cause parental acculturation stress, and the negative ramifications of this stress on Latino adolescent’s academic self-efficacy and academic performance. Keywords : Latino, parental acculturation stress, adolescents, academic self-efficacy
PARENT ACCULTURATION STRESS AND ACADEMIC SELF-EFFICACY 3 What is the Relationship between Parent Acculturation Stress, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Academic Performance in Latino American Adolescents? Introduction Statement of the Problem The number of immigrants and immigrant children throughout the US doubled during the two decades between 1990 and 2007, and presently, an estimated 25 percent of American children aged 18 years and below are from immigrant households (Gong, Marchant, & Cheng, 2015 ). With the continued growth of the Latino population in America, more attention is being given to the role of protective and risk factors of US-born and immigrant Latino children, particularly as regard academic self-efficacy and academic accomplishment. In fact, some studies have documented heightened risk for psychological distress and poor academic performance among Latino immigrants because of the stress associated with acculturation (Kiang, Glatz, & Buchanan, 2017 ). Nevertheless, research also suggests that Latino immigrants tend to perform better compared to their second and third generation peers, perhaps because of the protective effects of cultural norms and values (Santiago et al., 2014 ). Family conflict, especially parent acculturation conflict (stress), is among the most prominent risk factors for minority youths that increases the likelihood for behavioral problems, depression, and inadequate academic performance in Latino young adults and adolescents. In view of the challenges faced by racial minorities, researchers and educators continue to express their uneasiness over the educational path of this demographic group. It has become important to

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