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ActinMotilityLecture

ActinMotilityLecture - BE/APh161 Physical Biology of the...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style BE/APh161 – Physical Biology of the Cell Rob Phillips Applied Physics and Bioengineering California Institute of Technology
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Cells Decide: Where to Go (Berman et al.) The Hunters of the Immune Response There is another kind of rapid response to environmental cues that is much faster than gene regulation. The “decision” about where to go next is highly regulated and results in the synthesis of new cytoskeletal filaments at the leading edge of the cell. Once again, there is an interesting random walk story behind the scenes. (David Rogers)
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Cell Motility and Actin Polymerization Motility is driven by the protein actin. Actin assembles into long filaments. Through hydrolysis of ATP, these filaments can actually do work as a result of this polymerization process by pushing on membranes, for example. (Theriot et al.)
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The Story of ParM (Dyche Mullins et al .) The story of Par-m One of the most interesting stories for me is that of plasmid segregation in bacteria. This process is mediated by the bacterial cytoskeleton protein ParM.
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How Is Polymerization Controlled in Space and Time? Just as with the measurement of cell growth described earlier, bulk growth assays using light absorption (or fluorescence) as a readout have spoken volumes on mechanism. One of the outcomes of such experiments is the discovery of molecules that nucleate polymerization of new filaments (or branches off of existing filaments).
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