ch 5 - Chapter 5: Defining and Managing Project Scope...

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Chapter 5: Defining and Managing Project Scope True/False 1. According to the PMBOK area of scope management, one of the processes is scope planning which means ensuring that authority and resources are committed to developing a scope management plan. 2. Scope definition defines the project boundary. 3. Scope verification confirms the scope is complete and accurate. 4. Scope change control procedures protect the scope boundary from expanding as a result of increasing featurism. 5. Since adding features to a project will likely have a negative impact on schedules and budgets, once the project’s scope has been defined no new features should added. 6. The scope statement documents the sponsor’s needs and expectations. 7. The scope boundary establishes only those elements that are a part of the project work to be completed by the project team. 8. The scope boundary establishes both what is and is not part of the project work to be completed by the project team. 9. Project scope is a statement detailing the features and functions that must support the IT solution. 10. Project scope is a statement detailing the deliverables and activities that support the IT methodology. 11. One way to communicate the project’s deliverables is to create a deliverable definition table.
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12. The development of a deliverable structure chart is an interim step to define detailed work packages used to estimate the project schedule and budget. 13. The development of a work breakdown structure is an interim step to define detailed work packages used to estimate the project schedule and budget. 14. Product scope is a statement detailing the deliverables and activities that support the IT methodology. 15. Actors are people or external systems that are elements of a data flow diagram (DFD). 16. The use case diagram, a feature of the UML, is useful for defining the product scope. 17. Scope grope suggests a fundamental and significant change in the project scope. 18.
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ch 5 - Chapter 5: Defining and Managing Project Scope...

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