How important are the opinions of experts in the search for knowledge

How important are the opinions of experts in the search for knowledge

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How important are the opinions of experts in the  search for knowledge? The search for knowledge is one of the key motivations of human development. Most  scientific breakthroughs are the result of a search for knowledge, and one key characteristic of  this type of search is that the resolution of the initial search invariably leads to the start of a  new search. In other words, knowledge is not a static, finite thing that is reached and then  considered complete. Instead, the search for knowledge is an ongoing process in which each  new discovery leads to new questions. For the individual, most subjects are so vast that they  must rely on the views of experts to help them determine how best to proceed. In many cases,  the decision is not entirely up to the individual to make: the range of resources available to a  researcher, for example, will necessarily be limited according to the consensus view.  Furthermore, online search engines such as Google use Page Rank as a means of  determining expert views on a range of subjects. In other words, the opinions of experts are  one of the most important elements of any search for knowledge.  Despite considerable debate, no firm, universally accepted definition of knowledge has ever  been established. As Duncan Pritchard argues, knowledge is fundamentally concerned with  belief (Pritchard, 2006). In other words, if enough people believe something, it is accepted as  having transcended the status of subjective belief and is considered to be 'knowledge'. The  term knowledge confers a sense of acceptance by the broader community (Pritchard, 2006),  even though no item of knowledge can ever be truly known for certain without at least a  degree of doubt. The concept of knowledge is associated with a degree of certainty, to the  extent that beyond reasonable doubt something is known to be true. As James and Stuart  Rachels point out, the word knowledge is based on the word know, i.e. to be sure of a fact  suppositions and guesswork become cemented in culture as widely-accepted fact.  Nevertheless, there remains an element of doubt about any item of knowledge, since many  observers acknowledge that no item can be absolutely 'known' without doubt.  Consequently, it is reasonable to assume that the opinions of experts are a vital element in  the search for knowledge. Paul Tomassi suggests that experts are those who have studied  the available evidence and who understand how best to fit together the facts and, in many 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/31/2011 for the course PHIL 130 taught by Professor Waynejones during the Spring '11 term at Ave Maria.

Page1 / 5

How important are the opinions of experts in the search for knowledge

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online