Does the way you describe something affect how you feel about it

Does the way you describe something affect how you feel about it

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Does the way you describe something affect how you feel about it? Jacky Chong Yes, it does. Some words have both descriptive and emotive meaning. That’s called emotionally laden language. For example, “hero”, “peace” and “democracy” have positive implication, while “thief”, “liar” or “pervert” have negative implication. Euphemisms means to substitute neutral sounding words for a negative sounding one. It’s a widely used form of emotive language. We use it to avoid taboo and protect others’ feeling. Euphemisms can mislead people’s feeling and point of view. For example, government may say “landscape management” instead of “cutting down forest”, because it hide the reality of what is happening and make an unacceptable practice sound
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Unformatted text preview: acceptable. In conclusion, although we are not totally sure about how language affects our feeling about something, there is evidence that peoples response on an sentence depends on how the sentence is phrased. In a survey, when people were asked if more money should be spent on assistance to the poor, 68 percent replied yes; but when they were asked if more money should be spent on welfare, theres only 24 percent replied yes. In another survey, people were far more willing to spend money on national defense than on the military....
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This note was uploaded on 12/31/2011 for the course PHIL 130 taught by Professor Waynejones during the Spring '11 term at Ave Maria.

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