Hamlet Soliloquy

Hamlet Soliloquy - Hamlet, Act I, Scene II, Line 129 –...

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Unformatted text preview: Hamlet, Act I, Scene II, Line 129 – Line 159 Jacky Chong Act I, Scene II (129–159) is where Hamlet’s first significant soliloquy occurs in. Hamlet gives this speech to the audience after bearing the repulsive and awkward scene that takes place at Claudius and Gertrude’s court. His mother and his former uncle, who is now his stepfather, ask him to remain in Denmark instead of returning to his education at Wittenberg, which is against Hamlet’s will. Here, for the first time, Hamlet thinks of suicide, when he desires that his “solid flesh would melt” (Act I, Scene II, 129). This soliloquy draws forth one of the central ideas of the whole play: morality. Hamlet wishes that “self-slaughter” is not a sin (Act I, Scene II, 133). The world is painful to live in for Hamlet. However, because of the Christian background of the play, if one commits suicide, one will suffer in hell forever. The question of the morality of suicide in a painful world appears throughout the rest of the play, for example, in the most famous line in all English...
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This note was uploaded on 12/31/2011 for the course LANG 111 taught by Professor Lancebeck during the Spring '11 term at Ave Maria.

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Hamlet Soliloquy - Hamlet, Act I, Scene II, Line 129 –...

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