Introduction to Reading skills

Introduction to Reading skills - Introduction to Reading...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Reading skills Read the following passage and answer the questions. At university and college, all four skills in English are important: listening, for information in lectures, seminars and tutorials speaking, when taking part in seminars and tutorials reading, of textbooks, journals and handouts and writing, for essays and reports Of these, reading is at least as important as any of the four. Students at tertiary level have a huge amount of reading to do; some for core information and even more as background to the main subject. It is therefore essential that it be done as efficiently as possible. Written text has one distinct advantage over spoken discourse: it is static. Whilst this means that a text can be reviewed as many times as the reader wishes, the rate at which text is read will depend entirely on the speed of the readers eye movements. Given the amount of reading that most students have to do, it is clearly in their interests to do so as quickly and as effectively as possible. Obviously students must understand what they are reading. Less obviously, reading slowly does not necessarily increase comprehension. In fact, increasing reading speed may actually improve understanding. One thing to bear in mind is that reading, whilst being a receptive skill, is most certainly not a passive one. There must be an interactive process between the reader and the text in order to extract the meaning. To illustrate this, some common misconceptions, and some common sense, are discussed below. Vocabulary and discourse Clearly one must have a command of the words of a language before comprehension can be achieved. There are, however, at least two other levels to be considered: syntax and discourse. It is almost pointless attempting to make sense of comprehensible lexis if one is not also very clear about how words are strung together in the target language. An understanding of word order, and the significance of changes in word order, are vital. The anticipation and recognition of common, acceptable and essential collocations clearly help the process of extracting information and meaning. Beyond this, it is also of help the process of extracting information and meaning....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/01/2012 for the course ECONOMICS 101 taught by Professor Sedataybar during the Spring '11 term at Kadir Has Üniversitesi.

Page1 / 7

Introduction to Reading skills - Introduction to Reading...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online