100 Helpful Photography Tutorials for Beginners and Professionals

100 Helpful Photography Tutorials for Beginners and Professionals

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100 Helpful Photography Tutorials for Beginners and Professionals Photography as both a profession and a hobby is an incredibly expansive topic that covers a remarkably vast range of subjects from science and art. No matter where you lie on the professional spectrum, there is simply always more to learn. We spent countless hours scouring the web for the best content we could find and share with you, and today we’ll help you expand your knowledge with 100 photography related tutorials! Basic Theory and Technical Info 10 Top Photography Composition Rules The only rule in photography is that there are no rules . However, there are many composition guidelines which can be applied in almost any situation, to enhance the impact of a scene. Below are ten of the most popular and most widely respected composition 'rules'. Rule of Thirds The most important elements (the horizon and the haystack) are placed on or around the lines and points of intersection. Image by Cayusa . Imagine that your image is divided into nine equal segments by two vertical and two horizontal lines. Try to position the most important elements in your scene along these lines, or at the points where they intersect. Doing so will add balance and interest to your photo. Some cameras even offer an option to superimpose a rule of thirds grid over the LCD screen, making it even easier to use.
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Balancing Elements The figure in this scene is balanced by the rocks in the foreground. Image by manipula . Placing your main subject off-centre , as with the rule of thirds, creates a more interesting photo, but it can leave a void in the scene which can make it feel empty. You should balance the 'weight' of your subject by including another object of lesser importance to fill the space. Leading Lines The line of the chain leads the eye into the scene towards the boat. When we look at a photo our eye is naturally drawn along lines . By thinking about how you place lines in your composition, you can affect the way we view the image, pulling us into the picture, towards the subject, or on a journey 'through' the scene. There are many different types of line - straight, diagonal, curvy, zigzag, radial etc - and each can be used to enhance our photo's composition.
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Symmetry and Patterns The symmetry of this scene is broken by the uneven staircase and the closed curtain. Image by B G . We are surrounded by symmetry and patterns, both natural and man-made, and they can make for very eye-catching compositions, particularly in situations where they are not expected. Another great way to use them is to break the symmetry or pattern in some way, introducing tension and a focal point to the scene. Viewpoint The unusual viewpoint of this photo makes for an interesting composition. Image by dollie_mixtures . Before photographing your subject, take time to think about where you will shoot it from. Our
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2011 for the course MECHANICAL 101 taught by Professor Jskushawaha during the Spring '11 term at IIT Kanpur.

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100 Helpful Photography Tutorials for Beginners and Professionals

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