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IRB VIDEO - IRB VIDEO Evolving concern Protection for human...

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IRB VIDEO: Evolving concern: Protection for human subjects 1926: Paul De Kruif published “Microbe Hunters” A popular history of biomedicine. In it, he portrayed researchers, such as Louis Pasteur and Walter Reid as independent visionaries struggling alone to understand and conquer disease. Represents a transition. Researchers of the past worked alone, and took sole responsibility of their research with humans. However, the entire scale of research was expanding. By the second half of the 20 th century, science had provided numerous new techniques in the diagnosis, prevention, and cure of disease. Public appeal and support encouraged even more research The number of experiments, and thus the number of human subjects increased. Scientists were in the forefront of those reminding us of our responsibility to research subjects. Researchers were increasingly concerned that the growing number of subjects receive adequate protection from risk. Given the increasing complexity and scale of scientific research, some began to wonder if
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IRB VIDEO - IRB VIDEO Evolving concern Protection for human...

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